Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Paulh29

Are Chilli's Ok

Recommended Posts

Has anybody heard of feeding birds with

hot chilli's.

I am unsure about this (burny burny), however

that is what i have been told by an experinced breeder.

 

Hmmmmmmm :devil: Burny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think that is a good idea but I have had no experience with it and haven't heard it before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't think that is a good idea but I have had no experience with it and haven't heard it before.

 

Thanks Daz,,,,I thought it would be a bit extreme.

 

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the hotter the chilli, the better!! :) Well no not really.

 

Hot peppers/chilli are fine for birds. I feed them to my Cockatoo all the time, and the budgies get one every now and then. They all love it.

 

The chilli actually doesn't burn a bird's tongue, I just watch where they stick their beak after they have had hot chilli. Wouldn't want them to transfer any of the chilli 'juice' into our eyes or mouth (for those who can't handle the heat that is).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the hotter the chilli, the better!! :P Well no not really.

 

Hot peppers/chilli are fine for birds. I feed them to my Cockatoo all the time, and the budgies get one every now and then. They all love it.

 

The chilli actually doesn't burn a bird's tongue, I just watch where they stick their beak after they have had hot chilli. Wouldn't want them to transfer any of the chilli 'juice' into our eyes or mouth (for those who can't handle the heat that is).

 

Cool thanks for your reply Cheeta

I wonder what nutrition they can get from Chilli's (vitamans etc)

Well I might try one and see how they go.

 

Cheers :P

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My African Grey eats them too my budgies are offered them but arent keen. Its true that they dont feel the heat like we do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beans – Powerful Nutrition

 

Technically, dried beans and pulses are the edible seeds that grow in pods on annual plants, bushes, or vines. In developed countries, they are considered vegetables, though botanists classify them as fruits. Bean seeds can be eaten fresh, sprouted, dried, and ground into flour. Because they can be easily stored and shipped, beans most frequently are dried, which prolongs their keeping qualities.

 

Worldwide, thousands of bean varieties flourish. Many beans and pulses are known by several names, depending on the culture and history of where they originated in the Old World and where they were first grown, and often still are produced, in the New World.

 

For centuries, dried beans and other pulses have served as a primary protein source for many cultures. Dried beans and their cousins still are dietary staples in many parts of the world, though "modern," but not necessarily healthier diets are supplanting these nourishing foods from everyday and customary consumption. While developing countries’ populations may be turning away from highly nutritious and indigenous foods such as beans, many consumers in wealthier, more developed countries are adding more dry beans to their diets. Growing interest in various ethnic cuisines and knowledge of the benefits of eating more plant-based foods are contributing to renewed research and increased popularity and consumption of beans in certain countries.

 

Dry beans and other pulses, also referred to as legumes – navy, red, black, kidney and white beans; cowpeas and black-eye peas; lentils and split peas; fava and lima beans; etc. – are nutrient-dense. That is, calorie for calorie, beans supply high levels of various nutrients.

 

Dried beans and other pulses/legumes are relatively inexpensive yet offer a healthful way to include nutrient-rich foods in the daily diet. According to the United Stated Department of Agriculture, analyses show that people who eat beans consume more vitamins and minerals than individuals who don’t eat beans.

 

A serving – 1/2 cup of cooked dry beans – supplies about 120 calories and lots of complex carbohydrates, though beans offer a low-glycemic index value. In other words, the carbohydrates in beans do not cause as quick or as steep a rise in blood sugar as do many other carbohydrate-rich foods.

 

Beans are a good source of B vitamins including folic acid. Beans also provide the minerals iron, potassium, selenium, magnesium and even some calcium. Dried beans and their cousins also are a good source of insoluble fiber, which promotes digestive health and relieves constipation. Beans also provide soluble fiber, which can help reduce fat levels in the blood.

 

Beans provide little fat and absolutely no cholesterol. While beans do not supply complete protein, researchers believe that the particular amino acids in dry beans may help prevent various diseases.

 

rest of article http://www.beansforhealth.org/beanfacts.html

 

this is why they want vegetarians to eat alot of legumes and beans since they don't get these vitamins from meat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Birds don't feel the heat- I've heard if you feed them to chooks it reduces/prevents worms (I think!) if this is true I spose it would work the same for other birds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...