Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Rashu

Starving Cock, A Hen And 6 Eggs...any Solution?

Recommended Posts

My cock (15 months old) and the hen (18 months old) have 6 eggs in the current clutch (1st two eggs were not viable), 5 of which are fertile (the 8th was laid 2 days ago so don't know it's status yet).

 

She;s not going to lay any more eggs (the next egg was supposed to arrive today but it didn't and her swelling subsided).

 

The first egg is due to hatch on the 7th of December if all goes well.

 

The problem I've been facing for about 2 weeks is that prior to the arrival of the first egg (about 3-4 days) I've noticed

that the cock has been losing weight.

 

Most people say that it is normal for first time birds to have some problem. The hen raised 3 clutches successfully before at her previous owner's place.

 

I have raised this cock since he was about 3 months old. He is a fine active cock, can talk, very affectionate. However he feeds the hen and doesn't eat for himself, unless I put food near his mouth with my hand. He didn;t do this before. He would eat and drink fine prior to the arrival of the eggs.

 

I offer them spinach, eggfood mixed with moist bread, protein and seed mix every day.

 

He just won;t eat unless the hen asks for food.

 

Today I found his crop flat, a little caved in. I fed him spinach leaves, took him out and he ate seeds out of my hand till his crop filled up (he ate for an HOUR).

 

I am afraid things might get worse once the chicks arrive. There might be a possibility he might eat more and keep some food for himself if he has to feed the chicks and the hen...or he just might starve himself to death.

 

He won;t eat any soft food I provide him.

 

I don;t want to lose my friend. I don;t know what;s wrong.

 

I might have to handfeed the chicks as I have no other pair breeding.

 

Is there something I could do for him, because he'll starve if I don;t feed him at least once a day.

To make matters worse, he started a moult again (he finished with his last moult 2 months ago, so this was not expected)

 

Or should I separate him from the hen and allow her to raise the chicks on her own. and help her feed the chicks when they;re about 5 days old?

 

 

151068_1144242455715386_1349116242_n.jpg

Edited by Rashu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi From your description of the situation I think you should remove the cock & let the hen feed any babies

that hatch, with a little help from you if she can't cope.....B.J.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try offering some seed that has been soaked in water overnight and rinsed well most birds relish this as it is easy for them to eat.

Otherwise same as what BJ said making sure she can access her food easily.

Cheers Jenny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I agree with BJ too. Up until I read the part where you said he has begun molting, I was thinking you could just make sure to take him out and feed him every day, and that might work. But a molt can be rough on a bird, even without him already having a problem and being underweight. And molting and breeding don't go well together. I think the safest thing to do is let the hen raise her clutch by herself.

 

You can keep a spray of millet in the box for the hen to munch on, and oats and seeds make good nesting material that is also edible. Even with their cocks to feed them, my hens come out every morning to eat the fresh vegetables when I bring them, so keep giving her the spinach and egg food etc.

 

When the chicks start hatching, just watch to see how well the hen feeds them. She might do fine on her own, but if their crops look emptyish, then you can help with supplemental feedings. You don't have to pull the chicks for hand raising if the hen can manage, but if there are a lot, and she seems to be having trouble, just taking one or two away can make a difference, and then she could cope with the rest. You will have to play that part by ear. If you can leave them with her until they are two weeks old, then you won't have to worry about doing night feedings with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...