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clearwing

Are Auctions Killing Our Hobby

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I don't think auctions are a deterent to entering the hobby.

 

When I started, I started with the usual beginner quality stock costing me $20 - 40. My best birds trace back to these birds. Until 2 weeks ago, I had never spent a lot on birds. At the Western Suburbs auction I purchased 3 birds that were very expensive. To do this, I have had to sell a lot of birds to cover the cost. The old adage, sell 10 to buy 1. I was chasing a feature that my birds can produce, but I want them to do it more consistently, so I selected these birds from a stud that has a reputation for producing the feature time and time again.

 

Beginners need patience, luck and skill. If they are well off, they can purchase expensive birds, but without the skill or patience (a $1000 bird is no guarantee of success) they will not get anywhere. They need to start at the bottom and work their way up. Bank the money from your culls and re-invest it wisely. I love the birds PJI has pictured in this thread. I could use some of that $50 action. Nice active feather and plenty of backskull!

 

From where I sit there are two things that are contributing to the decline of the hobby. The first is the size of house blocks in the new suburbs. These would average between 400 and 600 sq meters. Not a hope of having a house and birdroom and flights.

 

Secondly, this urban population does not have the interest in animals and breeding as previous generations have. TV, internet, xbox, wii, etc all compete for young peoples time. Breeding budgies is nerdy and wanky, Super Mario (not Capasso), warhammer, call of duty and halo are cool - budgies are for geeks and losers.

 

Cheers fellow budgie geeks!

 

PT

 

 

Thanks for your replies folks, I knew thisa thread would spark conversation and more importantly start people thinking how to revamp our hobby. Love your ideas Jimmy Banks now who do we know that could proiduce such programs. Keep up the replies folks and think outside the square, we have a committee here in Victoria trying to come up with fresh ideas to attract members. Cheers Clearwing

 

I don't think auctions are a deterent to entering the hobby.

 

When I started, I started with the usual beginner quality stock costing me $20 - 40. My best birds trace back to these birds. Until 2 weeks ago, I had never spent a lot on birds. At the Western Suburbs auction I purchased 3 birds that were very expensive. To do this, I have had to sell a lot of birds to cover the cost. The old adage, sell 10 to buy 1. I was chasing a feature that my birds can produce, but I want them to do it more consistently, so I selected these birds from a stud that has a reputation for producing the feature time and time again.

 

Beginners need patience, luck and skill. If they are well off, they can purchase expensive birds, but without the skill or patience (a $1000 bird is no guarantee of success) they will not get anywhere. They need to start at the bottom and work their way up. Bank the money from your culls and re-invest it wisely. I love the birds PJI has pictured in this thread. I could use some of that $50 action. Nice active feather and plenty of backskull!

 

From where I sit there are two things that are contributing to the decline of the hobby. The first is the size of house blocks in the new suburbs. These would average between 400 and 600 sq meters. Not a hope of having a house and birdroom and flights.

 

Secondly, this urban population does not have the interest in animals and breeding as previous generations have. TV, internet, xbox, wii, etc all compete for young peoples time. Breeding budgies is nerdy and wanky, Super Mario (not Capasso), warhammer, call of duty and halo are cool - budgies are for geeks and losers.

 

Cheers fellow budgie geeks!

 

PT

 

 

Thanks for your replies folks, I knew thisa thread would spark conversation and more importantly start people thinking how to revamp our hobby. Love your ideas Jimmy Banks now who do we know that could proiduce such programs. Keep up the replies folks and think outside the square, we have a committee here in Victoria trying to come up with fresh ideas to attract members. Cheers Clearwing

 

Sorry for the typos, have a bandaged finger and keep hitting two keys ar once. PS I don't hate auctions and have made a couple of outstanding purchases over the last two years, but I love the debate!

 

im pretty sure i read somewhere about a bumper sticker

they are asking for a slogan for a bumper sticker their is a prize for the best one

can you tell us a bit more about that clearwing

im sure their would be some fantastic lines from the guys on this sight

maybe even the wining one

its ment to intral people to join i think ...it this right ????

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OH I actually agree with you Chooky because my sons think I am geeky breeding and showing budgies lol. My mum just laughs at me when I tell her how well I have done at shows she starts to giggle and I say mum it is no different than racing greyhounds because that is what my family do they race grey hounds and I show budgies. :P When I told them last year the Martin T offered me 5 hundred for the white Df spangle she laughed again and I said I am serious and then she said did you sell him and I said of course not he is my best bird, but she couldn't believe a budgie is worth that much money :D

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I agree with Matt. The hobby is a life passion. If people crave fame or fortune through breeding budgies then this will ultimately lead to disappointment.

 

I have been through many cycles in this hobby. Right now I am *** busy often working 12 hour days and my weekends are full with running teenagers around to sport. It is a challenging time of life and I am sure many find it the same. I crave to have my hobby back. Unfortunately, for me I have little choice for now. However, I continue to strive for greater efficiency for managing my birds and still hope to breed the odd good one,

 

After fighting the neighbour from *** for 5 years I know all about Council issues (seems to have resolved for now.)

 

Regarding Auctions - having often travellled all over Australia, many years ago now, looking for suitable birds we now have a great shop window in the Budgie Auctions. All the varieties and quality depending on your pocket. I always say something for everyone.

 

Very good birds from good bloolines can be purchased for $200 - $400 each. These are the same prices good birds were going for at Auctions 30 years ago. In my mind the quality available overall is better. In my estimation, birds going for higher than these prices probably represent 10% of birds sold at Auctions at most. That leaves a lot of birds to pick from.

 

In my experience the key to sustained success in breeding good budgies is good management - breeding, feeding and housing. Recognising good bloodlines and knowing how to use them is the key. The hobby can be affordable - if you have a passion for it. Nobody will ever buy their way to success - whatever that is.

 

Just realised I cant say ***. Sorry

Edited by JeffL

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I'm with Jimmy. I LOVE budgie auctions. Everything about them - selling, buying, looking at the birds, the competition for the bird I want and the social environment. Having been in the hobby for 10 years means that I really don't think I've experienced it any other way than how it is now. Even when I started people were sending birds east for auctions but what I see now is more WA people sourcing birds from eastern states auctions.

 

Our WA auctions have MANY (too many in my opinion) lesser quality birds available for the beginner some selling for $30 or sometimes even less BUT people seem to want instant success and want top quality for nothing and to win overnight. Although I don't begrudge the people I have helped, I've noticed many want birds that have taken me 10 years to produce without realizing that those are the birds I will likely keep to work with and the lesser quality ones are the ones I will sell. So I agree wholeheartedly that beginners want that instant success and pay for it if they can where as the poorer but hard working beginner, unless they have the patience and persistence to keep at it, get left behind and get disillusioned.

 

I think this hobby does resemble the horse industry to a large degree. You might laugh but I'll explain why....... There is a proportion of people who have enough resources to buy themselves every winner under the sun, then there are the small time owners who have enough to own part of a horse and if they are lucky enough might find a winner. In budgies the richer ones can buy whatever stock they want in and can maintain their winning status even if they cannot breed livestock to save themselves. Then there are others that have enough to buy a few birds and work with them dillegently to get their winners over a much longer period of time.

 

I think there is room for all in this hobby but money certainly does help fast track your progress but unless you can afford to KEEP paying big bucks you still have to knuckle down and develop your own line.

 

Personally I don't think the lack of beginners in the hobby can be blamed on auctions - or not the larger proportion anyway. I agree with chookbreeder in that the population of today is vastly different. I do feel that to some degree that the budgie clubs are the quintessential "old boys clubs". A lot of the time I also think Halo is way cooler than a lot of old stuffed shirts who make up endless rules about something as pissy as a budgie. Honestly arguing forever about the importance of ring issue dates, how many birds should be benched at Nationals, the exact wording in the standard etc etc etc, let alone the anally retentive people that I have come across who INSIST that when I steward I should stand exactly 3m back and to the left of the judge, keep my head bowed and not even breath. Too many HUGE egos and super self important people is a real turn off. Then it's not a nice social environment so why even bother spending the money to start with if you don't want to spend time with the people anyway?

 

My mother, some 30 years ago went to her very first budgie club meeting here in Perth only to have to sit and listen to 2 hours of argument over trivial stupid stuff just like perch sizes, seed on the cage floor or no seed on the cage floor etc etc etc. Do you think she ever went back? So what has changed?

 

Big fish in little ponds I call it.............

 

My thoughts anyway.

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I suggested our club run a pet budgie show and invite anyone to bring in their pet budgies......have it at the same time as our budgie show but the other side of the room. It would encourage the pet budgie owners to look at ours and think maybe of trying it out. Hoping to get new members. We could throw in some ribbons and certificates. Advertise the show in petshops and vets and the paper. Heck even get the local newspaper to run an article or cover the show.

 

My idea was shot down in flames more than once. I keep trying.

 

 

You guys could be talking about the show dog fancy! (Other than the auction part.) It is hard to bring in the newcomers, or to keep them in, if they feel insulted by the people who are well-entrenched.

 

At our dog classes, people would come in with purebred pets they bought from pet shops, that look like mongrels, and the "real" purebred people would turn their noses up at them. But the smart ones wouldn't. They knew that if someone starts out with "just a pet", but are made to feel welcome, that person will buy a "show dog" next time, and become part of the future of the club.

 

Kaz, I think its terrible (but predictable) that your club shot down your suggestion. Kudos for being persistant. Maybe one day there will be other forward thinking people who will give your idea a try. Sometimes people have to hear something over and over again, before they accept it. (Then, of course, they will think it was their own idea!:P )

 

 

As for Clearwing's original question about auctions driving up the prices, I think this is an area that is also much like the dog world. It is like there is a sport within a sport. You have the top-winning, big players who spend a TON of money on this, because they have the money, and they can throw it around and win lots of ribbons and trophys to show for it. Then at a lower down level, you have the hard-working grass-roots hobbyists, who throw their whole life into it, and they do okay, but they rarely get to be the top famous names. Like the dog world, it is unfortunate that the "amateurs" have to compete against the "professionals".

 

A dog show is a major event as far as work needed to produce one. (Which I am sure is the same for a budgie bench show.) But what I think is lopsided, is that the dog shows are manned by hard working volunteers and club members, giving up their time. Yet these dog shows are the workplace of the highly paid professional dog handlers who make a living showing dogs for rich people. Those professionals don't pay any higher entry fees than regular hobbyists, but they would have no where to earn their money, if it weren't for the volunteers. So you have basically two different groups competing for the same prize.

 

(Obviously, it's a little different than a budgie show, because you don't have to "handle" the budgies, so you don't have the professional handler aspect. But you still have the rich-person element driving up the prices.)

 

(And I will stop talking about dogs now, because I realize this is supposed to be a budgie topic!:lol::blush: )

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Having been there Finnie, I totally agree. Same with horse shows too. The only difference is it's horrible bitchy women in dogs and horses and horrible bitchy men in chooks and budgies :) - sorry everyone I know this is a gross generalization and much of the present company is excluded of course ;)

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:rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

 

Oh, Nubbly! You have hit the nail on the head!

 

(I hope these emoticons will show up!)

 

:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

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:rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

 

 

 

(I hope these emoticons will show up!)

 

:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

 

 

NOPE !!

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Yes Nubbly you are right, I have been in Dogs and Horses and you do get those people , I even noticed in the budgies that hardly anyone gave me the time of the day when I first started until I started winning then I got hellos etc. But that was a different club that I am in now.

I know what you mean Nubbly about boring meetings, Geoff(clearwing) is a new President now and he is trying to get our meetings a fun night. We have already improved by bring supper and a cuppa and we have little bird shows with prizes.

Geoff wants our meetings to be fun to go to and I think that is a great.

I really don't hate auctions asl Chooky, I have fun when I there but it is having the money to by the bird you want.

Plus I have been warn to be careful because some breeders get rid of troubled birds there so I am not keen to spend heaps on one bird.

I have a couple of friends that spent huge amounts on 2 birds at auction a couple of months ago to get nothing from the cocks and nothings from the hens. That is what puts me off.

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just today i had someone come over to see how my programs is going a bit of support and a bit of a mentor and to ask me what the *** did i think when i payed 50 for that bird :rolleyes: and that one and that one

 

I hope these weren't the birds you bought for me! :o

 

Just kidding GB...

 

Seriously though - people like yourself are what this hobby needs. I'm only new to all this and you have helped my so so much it's made me want to get into the hobby even more. I can't thank you enough for all the help and support you've given me.

 

The same goes for everyone who contributes to this site (special mention to Kaz) - without it I might've just given up as I couldn't find anywhere to buy any decent birds. Now I'm as keen as mustard to breed really good quality birds and I now have more of an idea of what it takes to do it (as chookerbreeder said - time, patience and some luck!).

 

It's like any hobby really - once you get bitten by the 'bug' you can't get enough and this site has helped me gain so much knowledge, and the more I learnt, the more I want to learn. Resources like this provide people with information and help that they may not otherwise be able to get - that's what newbies like myself need. As others have said - if someone is starting out and they get assistance and help then they're much more likely to continue with the hobby, as opposed to be shunned and discouraged by the 'experts'.

 

The perception that it's a bit nerdy is probably right, but so is breeding any type of animal these days, whether it be dogs, fish, reptiles etc.. Changing these perceptions is difficult, as they've been ingrained in peoples thinking for many, many years. It may be an deterient for people wanting to enter the hobby or it might be a something that attracts people to it.

 

I certainly don't have a solution, but I can't wait to attend my first auction! :D

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There are a great many friendships formed in places like this with likeminded people. The nerd category only applies if you take it onboard.

 

I was pretty stoked to meet some very good friends ( from friendships formed here on BBC ) when I went to melbourne.

 

We are family of sorts here :D

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just today i had someone come over to see how my programs is going a bit of support and a bit of a mentor and to ask me what the *** did i think when i payed 50 for that bird :rolleyes: and that one and that one

 

I hope these weren't the birds you bought for me! :o

 

Just kidding GB...

 

Seriously though - people like yourself are what this hobby needs. I'm only new to all this and you have helped my so so much it's made me want to get into the hobby even more. I can't thank you enough for all the help and support you've given me.

 

The same goes for everyone who contributes to this site (special mention to Kaz) - without it I might've just given up as I couldn't find anywhere to buy any decent birds. Now I'm as keen as mustard to breed really good quality birds and I now have more of an idea of what it takes to do it (as chookerbreeder said - time, patience and some luck!).

 

It's like any hobby really - once you get bitten by the 'bug' you can't get enough and this site has helped me gain so much knowledge, and the more I learnt, the more I want to learn. Resources like this provide people with information and help that they may not otherwise be able to get - that's what newbies like myself need. As others have said - if someone is starting out and they get assistance and help then they're much more likely to continue with the hobby, as opposed to be shunned and discouraged by the 'experts'.

 

The perception that it's a bit nerdy is probably right, but so is breeding any type of animal these days, whether it be dogs, fish, reptiles etc.. Changing these perceptions is difficult, as they've been ingrained in peoples thinking for many, many years. It may be an deterient for people wanting to enter the hobby or it might be a something that attracts people to it.

 

I certainly don't have a solution, but I can't wait to attend my first auction! :D

 

 

lol no not birds you got i was actually questioned about a few of them

your lucky i am honest or maybe that green hen would be in a different flock by now :P along with the grey spangle and sky blue spangle

 

your welcome to the hens i just got but now need to part with

their good birds but they have not got the look my birds i breed have and this was pointed out and taken in

so i spent 200 and now need top sell before i even try them :( but its good solid advice

 

i have taken two years to get the look i have achieved and need to be careful not to put in anything less

so.... i stuck one in for you and a cinnamon grey cock anyways i know you dont want cinnamon but mate your going to want it one day

and these two birds are from top studs

and both birds untried they are a great pair you will get some beautiful chicks i paired them just for you

:)

ill most probably kick myself when you get chicks lol but ill also be glad you got a good chance of some great birds

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id agree but the breeder i saw on saturday said to me the birds i brought were worth 150 each and he gave them to me for 30 each so there are still some breeders out there who arent all about making money and remember what its like to start out. but i definitely understand what you guys are saying.

 

 

 

You were definitely well treated, thats partly why i asked who it was lol. I know quite a few of the NZ breeders and the local prices so you should be well pleased with what you got. $30 each is an absolute steal, although for a beginner its just what you need. Go back to that breeder when you've bred a few birds and need outcrosses.

 

definitely what part of nz are you from dean?

 

Im in hamilton, but I got my best birds from Tauranga and have travelled a bit to see whats around. Will probably do some more travelling soon.

 

i received an email from a breeder in hamilton who was selling alot of their stock because they were moving if you didnt already know?

 

Yes that will be from Tony and Robyn. I have some of their line. I think their best feature is actually that the hens (at least the ones i've had from her) lay around 10 eggs a piece. As a general rule their birds lack the length that other top breeders have, but they have good width/feather/spot and other features. I can tell you more in private if you like, but definitely some good birds to be had from there if you were to get in quick. I am crossing some of my tauranga birds with a couple of grinter hens at the moment, will be crossing back to the tauranga stock but the grinter hens should produce numbers for me.

 

 

yeah that sounds good dean id be interested to hear more. do you know them quite well?

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Having been there Finnie, I totally agree. Same with horse shows too. The only difference is it's horrible bitchy women in dogs and horses and horrible bitchy men in chooks and budgies :) - sorry everyone I know this is a gross generalization and much of the present company is excluded of course ;)

 

Only much of the present company, not all??? hahaha! Just stirring I know, I know, you were talking about me!!

 

 

 

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I don't think auctions are a deterent to entering the hobby.

 

When I started, I started with the usual beginner quality stock costing me $20 - 40. My best birds trace back to these birds. Until 2 weeks ago, I had never spent a lot on birds. At the Western Suburbs auction I purchased 3 birds that were very expensive. To do this, I have had to sell a lot of birds to cover the cost. The old adage, sell 10 to buy 1. I was chasing a feature that my birds can produce, but I want them to do it more consistently, so I selected these birds from a stud that has a reputation for producing the feature time and time again.

 

Beginners need patience, luck and skill. If they are well off, they can purchase expensive birds, but without the skill or patience (a $1000 bird is no guarantee of success) they will not get anywhere. They need to start at the bottom and work their way up. Bank the money from your culls and re-invest it wisely. I love the birds PJI has pictured in this thread. I could use some of that $50 action. Nice active feather and plenty of backskull!

 

From where I sit there are two things that are contributing to the decline of the hobby. The first is the size of house blocks in the new suburbs. These would average between 400 and 600 sq meters. Not a hope of having a house and birdroom and flights.

 

Secondly, this urban population does not have the interest in animals and breeding as previous generations have. TV, internet, xbox, wii, etc all compete for young peoples time. Breeding budgies is nerdy and wanky, Super Mario (not Capasso), warhammer, call of duty and halo are cool - budgies are for geeks and losers.

 

Cheers fellow budgie geeks!

 

PT

 

 

I agree with chook unfortunatey everyone wants to run before they walk. Purchasing related pairs from someone who is willing to help you is a far better more afordable and a quicker way to getting amongst the awards then buying birds from an auction. Those who spend heaps don't always breed the better birds. be patiant I never won my 1st grand champion for 15 years then I won 4 with 2 different birds.

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My best advice is to buy from onE or 2 breeders only like other memebers have mentioned above.

My first year Greg and I bought birds from 2 breeders and then went to another, so 3 different breeders in the first year and I set off for my first show with my pride and joy to discover my birds were tiny, but I did get a 1st placing. So I went home and culled all my birds from one breeder but I kept one spangle hen. It was like starting all over again.

 

Greg went to the other 2 breeders and bought me 2 pair from each for my birthday.

We put these birds together and with others I kept here from the same 2 breeders from the first year.

So off I went to my second year show and wow I won best young bird in beginners and he was in the running for the diploma but he wouldn't perch.

B ut that was where it all started from.

This year is my fifth year and I outcrossed and I really wish I didn't because I went off to auctions and brought birds, so I really mixed the blood up.

BVut hopefully it will pay off in the near future.

I hope this made sense

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My best advice is to buy from onE or 2 breeders only like other memebers have mentioned above.

My first year Greg and I bought birds from 2 breeders and then went to another, so 3 different breeders in the first year and I set off for my first show with my pride and joy to discover my birds were tiny, but I did get a 1st placing. So I went home and culled all my birds from one breeder but I kept one spangle hen. It was like starting all over again.

 

Greg went to the other 2 breeders and bought me 2 pair from each for my birthday.

We put these birds together and with others I kept here from the same 2 breeders from the first year.

So off I went to my second year show and wow I won best young bird in beginners and he was in the running for the diploma but he wouldn't perch.

B ut that was where it all started from.

This year is my fifth year and I outcrossed and I really wish I didn't because I went off to auctions and brought birds, so I really mixed the blood up.

BVut hopefully it will pay off in the near future.

I hope this made sense

 

 

lol almost exactly what i have done

only i havent shown my birds yet well i did show one very **** small albino but he did come first in section in our deploma

no ribbon just the albino young cocks their were only three

i think it was beginners class to so

i got second with my spangle hen and third same deal

 

im culling back to my 4 oridganal lines now

the rest go out gone bye bye good or not

i seen the diffrence or the two types of breeding as i been playing with both'

i think

the advice they giving is spot on

as i said no big prices needed to breed big birds

i found that out

:}

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PT , you have hit the nail on the head. Im a builder and 10 years back was building single storey houses on 600 square metre blocks , now am building Two Storey houses on 450 square metre blocks. there is no room for avairys. Also Local councils are now regulating or looking at what animals and pets you can have in your yard. Beginners shouldnt be buying quality birds from open breeders , they should be buying pet shop culls/ birds from intermediate and open breeders.

We live in a society that we have created through technology where young people have grown up with everything and everything is instant.

Our hobby is not an instant hobby , it is a life passion and ive seen many join my local club to sellout and leave in a couple of years. I dont think you will ever be able to keep these people in the club.

Our club raises funds by doing sausage sizzels at bunnings , this also puts the awareness of the hobby out there in the public, I recently built a web site for our club to allow local people with budgies to be able to find our club.

 

Hi Mat I have visited your site a few times but failed to get much of a response although it is very good.

I live in Gosford and have been travelling to Newcastle looking after my grandson Tuesday and Wed most weeks and havn't been able to get to your meetings.

I should be able to make the next one. Hope to meet you all.

 

As a relative newcomer to the hobby I find the definition of a good bird a little hard to fathom.

I know what I like and that is pretty and tame. A nice pet is what I am striving for at this stage.

I gave one of last years babies to my in laws and he is most appreciated.

That gave me a real buzz.

 

I guess different folks get different kicks out of their birds,

I am an aero modeller and scout leader at Point Clare.

I certainly can understand the difficulty with the current generation and the instant gratification it demands.

 

 

.

Edited by KAZ

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I'm with Jimmy. I LOVE budgie auctions. Everything about them - selling, buying, looking at the birds, the competition for the bird I want and the social environment. Having been in the hobby for 10 years means that I really don't think I've experienced it any other way than how it is now. Even when I started people were sending birds east for auctions but what I see now is more WA people sourcing birds from eastern states auctions.

 

Our WA auctions have MANY (too many in my opinion) lesser quality birds available for the beginner some selling for $30 or sometimes even less BUT people seem to want instant success and want top quality for nothing and to win overnight. Although I don't begrudge the people I have helped, I've noticed many want birds that have taken me 10 years to produce without realizing that those are the birds I will likely keep to work with and the lesser quality ones are the ones I will sell. So I agree wholeheartedly that beginners want that instant success and pay for it if they can where as the poorer but hard working beginner, unless they have the patience and persistence to keep at it, get left behind and get disillusioned.

 

I think this hobby does resemble the horse industry to a large degree. You might laugh but I'll explain why....... There is a proportion of people who have enough resources to buy themselves every winner under the sun, then there are the small time owners who have enough to own part of a horse and if they are lucky enough might find a winner. In budgies the richer ones can buy whatever stock they want in and can maintain their winning status even if they cannot breed livestock to save themselves. Then there are others that have enough to buy a few birds and work with them dillegently to get their winners over a much longer period of time.

 

I think there is room for all in this hobby but money certainly does help fast track your progress but unless you can afford to KEEP paying big bucks you still have to knuckle down and develop your own line.

 

Personally I don't think the lack of beginners in the hobby can be blamed on auctions - or not the larger proportion anyway. I agree with chookbreeder in that the population of today is vastly different. I do feel that to some degree that the budgie clubs are the quintessential "old boys clubs". A lot of the time I also think Halo is way cooler than a lot of old stuffed shirts who make up endless rules about something as pissy as a budgie. Honestly arguing forever about the importance of ring issue dates, how many birds should be benched at Nationals, the exact wording in the standard etc etc etc, let alone the anally retentive people that I have come across who INSIST that when I steward I should stand exactly 3m back and to the left of the judge, keep my head bowed and not even breath. Too many HUGE egos and super self important people is a real turn off. Then it's not a nice social environment so why even bother spending the money to start with if you don't want to spend time with the people anyway?

 

My mother, some 30 years ago went to her very first budgie club meeting here in Perth only to have to sit and listen to 2 hours of argument over trivial stupid stuff just like perch sizes, seed on the cage floor or no seed on the cage floor etc etc etc. Do you think she ever went back? So what has changed?

 

Big fish in little ponds I call it.............

 

My thoughts anyway.

"I think this hobby does resemble the horse industry to a large degree. You might laugh but I'll explain why....... There is a proportion of people who have enough resources to buy themselves every winner under the sun, then there are the small time owners who have enough to own part of a horse and if they are lucky enough might find a winner. In budgies the richer ones can buy whatever stock they want in and can maintain their winning status even if they cannot breed livestock to save themselves. Then there are others that have enough to buy a few birds and work with them dillegently to get their winners over a much longer period of time."

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This is similar to what happened when the imports from the uk took place nubbly,some of the big name breeders in Australia today, had deep enough pockets to import directly from the uk & are to this day, still benefiting from there investment .

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I'm with Jimmy. I LOVE budgie auctions. Everything about them - selling, buying, looking at the birds, the competition for the bird I want and the social environment. Having been in the hobby for 10 years means that I really don't think I've experienced it any other way than how it is now. Even when I started people were sending birds east for auctions but what I see now is more WA people sourcing birds from eastern states auctions.

 

Our WA auctions have MANY (too many in my opinion) lesser quality birds available for the beginner some selling for $30 or sometimes even less BUT people seem to want instant success and want top quality for nothing and to win overnight. Although I don't begrudge the people I have helped, I've noticed many want birds that have taken me 10 years to produce without realizing that those are the birds I will likely keep to work with and the lesser quality ones are the ones I will sell. So I agree wholeheartedly that beginners want that instant success and pay for it if they can where as the poorer but hard working beginner, unless they have the patience and persistence to keep at it, get left behind and get disillusioned.

 

I think this hobby does resemble the horse industry to a large degree. You might laugh but I'll explain why....... There is a proportion of people who have enough resources to buy themselves every winner under the sun, then there are the small time owners who have enough to own part of a horse and if they are lucky enough might find a winner. In budgies the richer ones can buy whatever stock they want in and can maintain their winning status even if they cannot breed livestock to save themselves. Then there are others that have enough to buy a few birds and work with them dillegently to get their winners over a much longer period of time.

 

I think there is room for all in this hobby but money certainly does help fast track your progress but unless you can afford to KEEP paying big bucks you still have to knuckle down and develop your own line.

 

Personally I don't think the lack of beginners in the hobby can be blamed on auctions - or not the larger proportion anyway. I agree with chookbreeder in that the population of today is vastly different. I do feel that to some degree that the budgie clubs are the quintessential "old boys clubs". A lot of the time I also think Halo is way cooler than a lot of old stuffed shirts who make up endless rules about something as pissy as a budgie. Honestly arguing forever about the importance of ring issue dates, how many birds should be benched at Nationals, the exact wording in the standard etc etc etc, let alone the anally retentive people that I have come across who INSIST that when I steward I should stand exactly 3m back and to the left of the judge, keep my head bowed and not even breath. Too many HUGE egos and super self important people is a real turn off. Then it's not a nice social environment so why even bother spending the money to start with if you don't want to spend time with the people anyway?

 

My mother, some 30 years ago went to her very first budgie club meeting here in Perth only to have to sit and listen to 2 hours of argument over trivial stupid stuff just like perch sizes, seed on the cage floor or no seed on the cage floor etc etc etc. Do you think she ever went back? So what has changed?

 

Big fish in little ponds I call it.............

 

My thoughts anyway.

"I think this hobby does resemble the horse industry to a large degree. You might laugh but I'll explain why....... There is a proportion of people who have enough resources to buy themselves every winner under the sun, then there are the small time owners who have enough to own part of a horse and if they are lucky enough might find a winner. In budgies the richer ones can buy whatever stock they want in and can maintain their winning status even if they cannot breed livestock to save themselves. Then there are others that have enough to buy a few birds and work with them dillegently to get their winners over a much longer period of time."

/////////////////////////

This is similar to what happened when the imports from the uk took place nubbly,some of the big name breeders in Australia today, had deep enough pockets to import directly from the uk & are to this day, still benefiting from there investment .

 

i agree with that

but their are some breeders out their with the big pockets willing to help other smaller breeders

it is a matter of whom you know and whom they know

and weather or not they think your worth investing their time in you to help

their is alot of breeders whom start buy great stock cheep or not then after few months sell everything off and pack it in

leaving the breeder whoms good faith in them whom may of given fantastic birds for next to nothing to help feeling disappointed as these were birds they let go not as they wanted to cull them but purely as they wanted to help

this leaves them with out stoke they themselves could of really used to better the own stud

so really most dont help as they have been burnt to many times

it took me a year before the true help has arrived

however i was lucky to come a crossed a few really good people whom started me on the right trake :}they wont be forgotten either and like them i will go on to help others interested to join the fancy

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As a newbie who has only been breeding show budges for 1 year this month, I can honestly say this is a hard hobby to be in.

I have never had a member from my club ring me to find out how I'm going or offer to look at my birds and give some advice.

I'v always had to ring them for advice etc, now I'm not blaming them totally as I do live a distance from them and I don't go to meetings

because the night the meetings are on doesn't work for me. This is a lonely hobby so whats the point of it?

 

Auctions well there good fun but I'v lost many a bird that I have purchased from them. I also have been told by breeders when trying to

purchase birds that they wont sell me birds they can get more money for at the auctions but are always willing to sell me there sparrows.

Some of the birds I got from auctions I have sold to my sons friends for $10 as a pet because there useless in the breeding cabinet.

Auctions are a good place to meet others, but even at the auctions members don't sit together lol

 

 

I have spent a lot of money setting up for this hobby, building aviary, birds, breeding cabinets etc was it worth it? time will tell I guess.

And another thing I have found is that people laugh at me when I tell them I breed show budgies, what's the go with that?

I'll battle along on my own with my son and just maybe we'll show them up one day at a show. I'm happy with my flock and will not

be buying any more. I have bred some nice birds but there still only 2 to 4 months old but looking promising.

 

Really if I hadn't found this forum and got all the great advice from people on here, I would have given up the hobby after 6 months.

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I find the hobby not that friendly also. BUT then there are some really nice breeders out there but they are few.

I find with most breeders unless you have deep pockets just forget it.

I have found myself not worrying about buying new birds in any more, have decided to work with my own and see how I go.

Clearwing on here is very generous and most helpful to our club members, with out him I would be totally lost.

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id most definitely agree it is sometimes hard with budgies although ive met a few breeders who were willing to help me out with advice and a good deal for birds but the majority want too much and seem to forget that helping out begginers will only help the hobby in years to come. i wouldnt say that i know alot about budgies in fact i know little but we all start out not knowing anything dont we? lately i sold some culls which i sold for cheap and all the people i sold them too i made sure that i shared whatever knowledge i could to help and a few even asked me for information regarding joining up to the local club! as for auctions.. im yet to attend one but there are a few coming up that i might make the effort to go see, whether i can afford whats on offer is another story mind you.........

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I find you need to have deep pockets to keep up in this hobby, mainly once you get to a certain stage like me.

My birds are almost there now, and I need to improve on what I already have.

Soon I will have to pay big bucks to bring something good in, BUT I do not have big bucks.

Lost my job last week so things are even tougher. Birdroom has come to a standstill for a while

I have applied for heaps of jobs to no avail, I am sure it is my age, really annoying.

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I find you need to have deep pockets to keep up in this hobby, mainly once you get to a certain stage like me.

My birds are almost there now, and I need to improve on what I already have.

Soon I will have to pay big bucks to bring something good in, BUT I do not have big bucks.

Lost my job last week so things are even tougher. Birdroom has come to a standstill for a while

I have applied for heaps of jobs to no avail, I am sure it is my age, really annoying.

 

im sorry i dont agree you need deep pockets or lots money to bring in a good bird

i do believe you need a good eye to be able to work with what you have a very good photographic memory and a very good ability to remember family lines and history with out going back through your books

even the birds you buy you need to retain a vision of their family's traits looks as so you do just go by what they visually look like you need to remember this so you can make certain not to double up on a fault that the bird your useings relatives dont hold the same one even going back to the grand father if possible

why its so much easier to breed good birds after 5 years as you have a good understanding of what faults each line has and can be certain not to bring it in or to double it up from other family's you may be running also

 

also auctions always have the odd pass in well worth any beginner grabbing

so would not thinking that well if their not good enough for the big guys then their not good enough for me

y as thats a crappy way to think as most likely that one no one wants will hold the hidden treasure :} and for a lousy 20.00 to 50.00 bucks now thats a deal if you ask me

 

sure birds are not cheep but that to me is only in their up keeping and maintenance

the birds themselves if you lok hard n dont just buy straight away you can always find a good one with exactly what your looking for and a good price its just matter of patience

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