Jump to content
Laraine

Advice Needed

Recommended Posts

I need advice regarding my budgie hens. In the last 10 days 2 of my young budgie hens have died when sitting on eggs. They appeared healthy, then a few hours later on the floor very sick, then they died.

 

I have never had this problem before, can someone please help before I lose more. They were in the same aviary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could have been eggbinding or could have been lack of calcium. Please give a whole lot more details including your setup and aviary.

How often do you check them and do you know the signs of eggbinding ? Seems you colony breed. How many do you have breeding in the aviary and how have you set it up. How to post photos is a link in my signature :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have any other birds in the aviary shown similar signs?

If you can try to save the bodies. It will be useful to get a post mortem examination done on them by a vet.

Pictures of your set up and of your birds will help greatly.

Your best bet is to consult an avian vet and they will be able to do a post mortem exam on your dead birds.

How many birds do you have in the aviary?

What types pf birds do you have in the aviary?

How big is the aviary?

What sort of flooring do you have?

Pictures would really help with this.

How old are the birds?

Have you had these problems before?

How far along were the birds in their laying and incubation?

There are many things that need to be looked at and your best bet is to go to an avian vet.

Edited by Sailorwolf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two of my young hens have both died while they were sitting on eggs. How can I tell if they were egg bound? Are their any other diseases pecular to breeding hens?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sorry to say laraine that if you dont know about breeding issues such as eggbinding you should not have nestboxes in for them. You need to learn a lot before breeding and while you have hens laying eggs you need to check them every day and looks for signs. Once you have chicks you need to check twice a day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Egg binding is a serious and often fatal condition that affects female birds of breeding age.

 

Because it's so important for egg bound hens to receive prompt medical treatment, owners should know what signs and symptoms to watch for in their pets. Read on for the most common signs of egg binding in birds, and always keep a close eye on mature female birds. Recognizing the signs of egg binding early on can be the key to your pet's survival.

Rapid or Labored Breathing: Many egg bound hens will look like they are having a hard time breathing. If you notice even slightly labored breathing in your bird, rush to your avian vet for prompt diagnosis and treatment.

 

Swelling: An egg bound hen may appear to have a swollen stomach or may show swelling around her bottom from straining to pass an egg. Birds with swelling on any part of their bodies should be seen by a medical professional as soon as possible.

 

Constipation: If you suspect that a hen may be egg bound, watch her droppings. If they look abnormal, or if she fails to produce any at all, get her to the avian vet straight away.

 

Fluffed Up Feathers: One of the most common symptoms of illness in birds, fluffed up feathers can also be a sign that a bird is egg bound. If you observe your bird sitting with her feathers fluffed up, assess her for any other symptoms or abnormalities and contact your veterinarian.

 

Straining: Egg bound hens will often visibly strain to try and pass their eggs. Birds that strain but show no progress in moving their eggs should be seen by a vet.

 

Sitting in the Cage Floor: Most of the time, birds that are egg bound will take to sitting in the cage floor. If you see this happen to your bird, get her to a vet immediately. Eggs that are stuck inside of a hen can put immense pressure on the bird's spine, sometimes causing paralysis and the inability to perch.

If you have observed these or any other abnormalities in your bird, please contact a qualified avian veterinarian. An avian vet will be able to properly diagnose your pet's problem, and get her on the road to a fast recovery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...