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Rainbow Budgerigar?


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what is a rainbow budgie??

 

i ave heard of it in the posts alot lately, and i am confused as to what it is?

 

is it a multicoloured bird?

or just another name for a mutation?

 

please help me.

 

alpaca-boy :rofl:

 

PS: pictures would be fantatsic if anyone owns one of these "rainbow" budgerigars :D

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Hi There

 

Yellowface opaline clearwings are what is being refered to when people talk about rainbows. You don't see them that often as they are not a standard variety but would be able to create them easily enough with the right birds. Thay are quite a pretty bird.

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I wont post any pictures but 'rainbow budgies' have been around for a while and I think the craze lies more with 'pet type' owners than it does with show breeders. The WBO defines a rainbow budgie as a combination of yellowface (any type) blue series opaline clearwing (a composite variety, not a specific mutation).

 

Because the craze lies more with pet type breeders, there is often a lot of "is my bird a rainbow budgie??". Typically people with YF2 opaline greywings or YF2 spangle opalines (sometimes with cinnamon) are called rainbows by their owners. You also get dominant pied thrown in the mix too as most people who want a rainbow will gladly call any multi-coloured budgie with little or no wing markings a rainbow :rofl: You should be able to google some pics easily enough.

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what is a rainbow budgie??

 

i ave heard of it in the posts alot lately, and i am confused as to what it is?

 

is it a multicoloured bird?

or just another name for a mutation?

 

please help me.

 

alpaca-boy :rofl:

 

PS: pictures would be fantatsic if anyone owns one of these "rainbow" budgerigars :D

 

 

well theirs diffrent types of rainbow budgies

but a true rainbow would be classed as a

df goldenface clear wing opaline dom pied in violet ,skyblue ,mauve or cobalt

these can be added two with spangle

ideally you keep out cinnamon but mostly people breed a part rainbow which has cinnamon instead of clearwing

te diffrence is the beautiful bright colours are dulled to pastel

 

here is a cinnamon goldenface voilet opaline dom pied hen i breed

note the clear split of the three colours

green yellow and violet

the rainbow efect

 

DSC062671.jpg

and on the back the opaline v is blue going down to green and flights are clear white

back

DSC062691.jpg

 

also yf type 1 are used for rainbows

the clear wing one is the true one

Edited by GenericBlue
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Yep.......nothing new...only new to you :rofl:

 

Not a craze either.

 

Just a thing some pet breeders get into and an adopted name not a mutation as such.

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thanks guys i get it now....

 

so they are just;

 

-goldenface (YF)

-opaline

-clearwing

-dominant pied

-Blue series colour

 

 

but what is a clearwing? does that just refer to the flights that are not coloured?

or is it referingto the whole wings?

 

ps: GB very pretty bird . good example too i can see the transition in colours

just like a rainbow !! ;)

DSC062691.jpg

 

nice!

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but what is a clearwing? does that just refer to the flights that are not coloured?

or is it referingto the whole wings?

 

Clearwing is an actual mutation, not a description

Edited by KAZ
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but what is a clearwing? does that just refer to the flights that are not coloured?

or is it referingto the whole wings?

 

Clearwing is an actual mutation, not a description

yes as in a clear wing budgie as it shows up the Opaline very well

my budgie is as i said a description not an actuall rainbow

but close as i could get to showing you

since i went into show birds i stopped my effort to breed a full rainbow

however for myself when i get the right mutations

im going to breed them in show size although im frowned a pone for this

i was told breed lorriceets if i want to breed rainbows

 

;) how ever its my time my birds my want

so i will be doing it but first i need to get all the mutations needed it took me three years to just get to the one you saw

you can get their a lot quicker but i started at scratch

before i got to the clear wing i went in to show birds ;)

i have the dom i have a the violet i have a yf type 1 cobalt and spangles i just this time am going to start with clear wings which i dont have yet

but some breeders i know have clear wings so maybe it wont be to far off

when i do i will do a full breeding journey to the end rezult that would be fun

im getting astralian yf soon i hope i had one but he was never quiet right and went to haven :(

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Dominant pied is not part of the official classification - it is just commonly seen in what pet owners refer to as their 'rainbow' budgie, partly because it helps create a separation of colours so you can say 'oh look its even more colourful'.

 

Officially it is yellow face (any type) blue series (violet, sky, cobalt, mauve) opaline clearwing (actual recessive variety which has normal body colour and zero to faint wing markings ideally). It is a composite variety as I said before ;)

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Dominant pied is not part of the official classification - it is just commonly seen in what pet owners refer to as their 'rainbow' budgie, partly because it helps create a separation of colours so you can say 'oh look its even more colourful'.

 

Officially it is yellow face (any type) blue series (violet, sky, cobalt, mauve) opaline clearwing (actual recessive variety which has normal body colour and zero to faint wing markings ideally). It is a composite variety as I said before ;)

 

dean is dead right

i added dom as i like the challenge of the df golden face

its still a challange in normals but as dean said its much prettier in a dom

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Rainbows are new to me to. I have heard of them but never seen one, until now. Also, I wasn't sure what mutations the harlequin budgies are. Dominate or recessive pieds?

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ahh yes rachelm i too have heard of this harlequin

 

is it some unusual mutation or another name for pied budgies??????????

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ahh yes rachelm i too have heard of this harlequin

 

is it some unusual mutation or another name for pied budgies??????????

its just old school for a golden face cobalt or sky blue or violet spangled( usually) rec pied thats all

even golden face norm rec pieds

as the five mixes colours hence the name harlequin ;)

black

yellow

green

blue

white flights on wings

not all rec pieds are refered to as harliquins only these goldenface type for the reason i stated to tell between dark green and sf gf birds in cobalt easily in your flock

again a pet type breeder thing ;)

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The term 'Harlequin' as far as my research shows is of Amercian origin and was not in general usage in any other country. The term refers to the Recessive Pied in green and blue series. It does not account for any other mutation being involved although when they are the bird is still referred to as a Harlequin as long as it is a Recessive Pied.

 

The Spangle mutation had not yet surfaced in Australia when the Herlquin was named so to say.

 

If you pick up any book written by an American you will find reference to the Harlequin. Example: TFH Publication Budgerigar Handbook by Ernest H. Hart 1970 edition.

Look at pages 173, 177, 211 you will find pictures of Recessive Pieds, only one is Yellowface and none are Spangle.

 

I have on hand the 50th Anniversary 1941-1991 Edition of the Offical Standard of Perfection of the American Budgerigar Society Incorprated. There standard for the most part is the same as the British they do put in their own names. Under the descriptions for Recessive Pied you'll find it written as "VARIETY: RECESSIVE PIED (DANISH OR HARLEQUIN) LIGHT GREEN".

 

Historical notes for Harlequin and it's origins http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlequin

 

Here is a Harlequin Great Dane. http://www.all-about-great-danes.com/harle...reat-danes.html

Edited by RIPbudgies
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The term 'Harlequin' as far as my research shows is of Amercian origin and was not in general usage in any other country. The term refers to the Recessive Pied in green and blue series. It does not account for any other mutation being involved although when they are the bird is still referred to as a Harlequin as long as it is a Recessive Pied.

 

The Spangle mutation had not yet surfaced in Australia when the Herlquin was named so to say.

 

If you pick up any book written by an American you will find reference to the Harlequin. Example: TFH Publication Budgerigar Handbook by Ernest H. Hart 1970 edition.

Look at pages 173, 177, 211 you will find pictures of Recessive Pieds, only one is Yellowface and none are Spangle.

 

I have on hand the 50th Anniversary 1941-1991 Edition of the Offical Standard of Perfection of the American Budgerigar Society Incorprated. There standard for the most part is the same as the British they do put in their own names. Under the descriptions for Recessive Pied you'll find it written as "VARIETY: RECESSIVE PIED (DANISH OR HARLEQUIN) LIGHT GREEN".

 

Historical notes for Harlequin and it's origins http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlequin

 

Here is a Harlequin Great Dane. http://www.all-about-great-danes.com/harle...reat-danes.html

what can i say to that rip :D your very tharow

as with me i just relayed what i was explained by a breeder when i was 12 :lol: so..... and i adopted this methord in my pet breeding flock

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The term 'Harlequin' as far as my research shows is of Amercian origin and was not in general usage in any other country. The term refers to the Recessive Pied in green and blue series. It does not account for any other mutation being involved although when they are the bird is still referred to as a Harlequin as long as it is a Recessive Pied.

 

The Spangle mutation had not yet surfaced in Australia when the Herlquin was named so to say.

 

If you pick up any book written by an American you will find reference to the Harlequin. Example: TFH Publication Budgerigar Handbook by Ernest H. Hart 1970 edition.

Look at pages 173, 177, 211 you will find pictures of Recessive Pieds, only one is Yellowface and none are Spangle.

 

I have on hand the 50th Anniversary 1941-1991 Edition of the Offical Standard of Perfection of the American Budgerigar Society Incorprated. There standard for the most part is the same as the British they do put in their own names. Under the descriptions for Recessive Pied you'll find it written as "VARIETY: RECESSIVE PIED (DANISH OR HARLEQUIN) LIGHT GREEN".

 

Historical notes for Harlequin and it's origins http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlequin

 

Here is a Harlequin Great Dane. http://www.all-about-great-danes.com/harle...reat-danes.html

what can i say to that rip :D your very tharow

as with me i just relayed what i was explained by a breeder when i was 12 :lol: so..... and i adopted this methord in my pet breeding flock

 

 

GB I learnt a very long time ago to not believe everything I heard from ordinary folk.

 

The only thing I cannot find is why the American's came up with that term.

When you look at the history in regards the usage of the word even that has a few missing pieces.

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The term 'Harlequin' as far as my research shows is of Amercian origin and was not in general usage in any other country. The term refers to the Recessive Pied in green and blue series. It does not account for any other mutation being involved although when they are the bird is still referred to as a Harlequin as long as it is a Recessive Pied.

 

The Spangle mutation had not yet surfaced in Australia when the Herlquin was named so to say.

 

If you pick up any book written by an American you will find reference to the Harlequin. Example: TFH Publication Budgerigar Handbook by Ernest H. Hart 1970 edition.

Look at pages 173, 177, 211 you will find pictures of Recessive Pieds, only one is Yellowface and none are Spangle.

 

I have on hand the 50th Anniversary 1941-1991 Edition of the Offical Standard of Perfection of the American Budgerigar Society Incorprated. There standard for the most part is the same as the British they do put in their own names. Under the descriptions for Recessive Pied you'll find it written as "VARIETY: RECESSIVE PIED (DANISH OR HARLEQUIN) LIGHT GREEN".

 

Historical notes for Harlequin and it's origins http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlequin

 

Here is a Harlequin Great Dane. http://www.all-about-great-danes.com/harle...reat-danes.html

what can i say to that rip :D your very tharow

as with me i just relayed what i was explained by a breeder when i was 12 :lol: so..... and i adopted this methord in my pet breeding flock

 

 

GB I learnt a very long time ago to not believe everything I heard from ordinary folk.

 

The only thing I cannot find is why the American's came up with that term.

When you look at the history in regards the usage of the word even that has a few missing pieces.

 

 

i learn t myself a long while ago rip that you were a very reliable source so i am not bagging you in anyway

just commending you for your extensive effort into the resource of your posts

i know first hand words you speak are from researched knowledge not just thoughts :)

why i turn to you for my genetic references when in doubt

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The term 'Harlequin' as far as my research shows is of Amercian origin and was not in general usage in any other country. The term refers to the Recessive Pied in green and blue series. It does not account for any other mutation being involved although when they are the bird is still referred to as a Harlequin as long as it is a Recessive Pied.

 

The Spangle mutation had not yet surfaced in Australia when the Herlquin was named so to say.

 

If you pick up any book written by an American you will find reference to the Harlequin. Example: TFH Publication Budgerigar Handbook by Ernest H. Hart 1970 edition.

Look at pages 173, 177, 211 you will find pictures of Recessive Pieds, only one is Yellowface and none are Spangle.

 

I have on hand the 50th Anniversary 1941-1991 Edition of the Offical Standard of Perfection of the American Budgerigar Society Incorprated. There standard for the most part is the same as the British they do put in their own names. Under the descriptions for Recessive Pied you'll find it written as "VARIETY: RECESSIVE PIED (DANISH OR HARLEQUIN) LIGHT GREEN".

 

Historical notes for Harlequin and it's origins http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlequin

 

Here is a Harlequin Great Dane. http://www.all-about-great-danes.com/harle...reat-danes.html

 

I was thinking the same thing RIP, "VARIETY: RECESSIVE PIED (DANISH OR HARLEQUIN) LIGHT GREEN". I read my info in the Budgerigar Cult It's called something like that.

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The term 'Harlequin' as far as my research shows is of Amercian origin and was not in general usage in any other country. The term refers to the Recessive Pied in green and blue series. It does not account for any other mutation being involved although when they are the bird is still referred to as a Harlequin as long as it is a Recessive Pied.

 

The Spangle mutation had not yet surfaced in Australia when the Herlquin was named so to say.

 

If you pick up any book written by an American you will find reference to the Harlequin. Example: TFH Publication Budgerigar Handbook by Ernest H. Hart 1970 edition.

Look at pages 173, 177, 211 you will find pictures of Recessive Pieds, only one is Yellowface and none are Spangle.

 

I have on hand the 50th Anniversary 1941-1991 Edition of the Offical Standard of Perfection of the American Budgerigar Society Incorprated. There standard for the most part is the same as the British they do put in their own names. Under the descriptions for Recessive Pied you'll find it written as "VARIETY: RECESSIVE PIED (DANISH OR HARLEQUIN) LIGHT GREEN".

 

Historical notes for Harlequin and it's origins http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlequin

 

Here is a Harlequin Great Dane. http://www.all-about-great-danes.com/harle...reat-danes.html

 

I was thinking the same thing RIP, "VARIETY: RECESSIVE PIED (DANISH OR HARLEQUIN) LIGHT GREEN". I read my info in the Budgerigar Cult It's called something like that.

 

 

In the 6th Edition (1983) of The Cult of the Budgerigar Watmough writes:

 

Pieds and Clear Flighted.-When the fourth edition of this book was printed the story of the Variegated (Pied) and the Flighted Budgerigar was confusing. People talked and wrote of Danish Pieds, Dutch Pieds, Harlequins, Penguins, Dominant Flighteds, Recessive Pieds, Finnish Pieds, etc.

 

The 5th Edition (1960) the working title of the paragraph began as Variegated (Pied) and Clear Flighted but all else was the same.

 

The 4th Edition (1954) Watmough makes reference to a Mr Illingworth whose had written on Flighted Pieds but then made reference to Harlequins. The paragraph is quite long to reproduce here and really needs to be read in context with the rest of the writings. But on the face of it Illingworth's description of the Harlequin is not that of a Recessive Pied.

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