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Why Can't We Import Budgies From The U.k. Anymore ?

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Thats it in a nutshell.....................

 

 

What is the real reasons we cannot import birds from the UK anymore ? If other animals and birds can come in, why not budgies ?

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Thats it in a nutshell.....................

 

 

What is the real reasons we cannot import birds from the UK anymore ? If other animals and birds can come in, why not budgies ?

 

 

I'm not sure what Biosecurity reasons there are for not allowing Budgerigar importataion from UK/Europe, but i think its good for the hobby that we dont have birds being imported like happened 10 - 15 years ago.

 

For me it would ruin our hobby by allowing people with even deeper pockets from making a killing out of genunine breeders (like most on this forum). Whilst the top birds in UK/Europe are truly awesome, there have been some top budgies shown at the Nationals recently that by all accounts would be competitive with there top birds. If you follow the show results for around the counrty you will see that the spread of top quality birds is quite wide, and not been dominated by a select few. If importation was to happen this spread of quality birds would be reduced greatly to the ones with the deepest pockets.

 

Anyway whose to say that we dont have recent UK/Europe blood brought in. There are numerous stories about well known breeders dramatically changing there birds overnight, with the assumption that they have smuggled eggs in, these stories are wide spread and well known.

 

Just my thoughts. I'm interested to hear other viewpoints.

Edited by Heathrow

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i'm guessing the hype on it died so the reports stopped.

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I think that if imports started again it would be a good thing,"most" of the big name breeders imported birds,& anyone who want's a quality bird these days usually will have to buy birds from them, usually via an auction.So why not give everyone the option of spending there hard earned money where they choose.There are horses that are imported each year to race in the Melbourne cup ,pigeons are allowed to be imported into Australia so what's the problem with budgerigars?.

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I think that if imports started again it would be a good thing,"most" of the big name breeders imported birds,& anyone who want's a quality bird these days usually will have to buy birds from them, usually via an auction.So why not give everyone the option of spending there hard earned money where they choose.There are horses that are imported each year to race in the Melbourne cup ,pigeons are allowed to be imported into Australia so what's the problem with budgerigars?.

Yeah. I cannot fathom why pigeons can come in and not budgies. :lol:

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I think that if imports started again it would be a good thing,"most" of the big name breeders imported birds,& anyone who want's a quality bird these days usually will have to buy birds from them, usually via an auction.So why not give everyone the option of spending there hard earned money where they choose.There are horses that are imported each year to race in the Melbourne cup ,pigeons are allowed to be imported into Australia so what's the problem with budgerigars?.

Yeah. I cannot fathom why pigeons can come in and not budgies. :lol:

yes sky rats :P

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It is a good question you ask why,I remember going to a talk, with the Quarinteen, years back & I think

it was to do with,one of the deases, incombation,time,threy were useing big words,at the time,I thought,

thats okay but they were geting on top of it & then there was another break out of it some where.

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Thats it in a nutshell.....................

 

 

What is the real reasons we cannot import birds from the UK anymore ? If other animals and birds can come in, why not budgies ?

Is it possible to import budgie sperm? I know of a lady that imports German Shepherd sperm from top German bloodlines for her stud.

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My understanding is that when newcastle disease and avian influenza outbreaks occurred AQIS went into meltdown and stopped bird and bird product (eggs, feathers etc) imports into Australia.

 

As for dogs and cats etc depending on which route the animal takes and the number of days it spends in a quarantine facility in it's home location it'll spend either 3 months or 6 months in quarantine here in Aus. Knowing how poor the animal care (having seen it first hand here in WA facility) is, I doubt that any bird subjected to the same measures would survive anyway.

 

With budgie sperm, no research has been done on storability. Horse, dog, sheep etc sperm is able to be stored in different substrates in very cold temps. We could collect sperm but would have no idea if the sample would remain alive until it could be used. Also there are very strict reglulations as to certain species and bringing in sperm for example sheep semen can only be brought into Aus after the donor animal is slaughtered and checked for scrapie (indicator of mad cow disease) and only if found negative will the sperm be allowed into Aus. Not something most stud breeders in Europe want to do just to send some sheep sperm into Australia.

 

Pigeons can be imported still but from a restricted number of countries and must adhere to quite a number of stringent requirements and are held in quarantine for 35 days with a monitor flock of chickens in close proximity. I would imagine that this would be an EXTREMELY expensive exercise to undertake. For all the requirements see here: http://www.aqis.gov.au/icon32/asp/ex_casec...;LogSessionID=0

 

I know quite a number of people who have imported dog from Europe and America and I can tell you, you definitely need deep pockets to do it!

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I thought I read somewhere that budgie sperm dies within minutes. I don't know if this is right

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Sperm sent overseas is treated and stored in preservative solutions that provide fuel for the sperm as well as stopping them from freezing/bursting/degrading in low low temperatures. As mentioned in the previous post, no tests have been done to find a suitable solution or container/method for storage. Theres just not enough economic interest in budgies, nor enough money or interest in the pockets of hobbyists.

 

I have heard there is illegal importing in aus and NZ of budgerigars. I dont know who in NZ has them, certainly they arent in the north island as i've seen our 'best' and while it might be able to get say top 3 in aus competitions, we wouldnt take out nationals or anything. Lucky to get a top 3 local, top 10 national. So I guess they either are just that - rumours, or they are not shown (yet).

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If they have come in through the back door,there is no way,they would be put up in public,

They would be breed from,for a year or 2 & even then,they would have to be,shown by one of the top breeders,

I would think,if you appeared on the show scene,with buff budgies,there would be alot of question asked,

& you would have to have thew right answers I would think. -_-

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Biosecurity Australia’s Statement on Budgerigar Imports

 

 

 

The following is an extract from Biosecurity Australia (Live Animal Imports – Horses, Livestock and Birds) in relation to the ongoing rumours that importation of budgerigars will be commencing within the year:

 

Live parrots are currently not permitted entry into Australia from anywhere other than New Zealand (and then only genuine pets accompanying people who are emigrating to Australia from New Zealand).

 

Import conditions have not been developed for the importation of live parrots from any other country.

 

Biosecurity Australia is the agency responsible for risk assessment of new commodities.

 

Please note that once any risk assessment process starts, it is likely to take a period of years to complete.

 

Risk assessments are completed on a work priority basis, and it may take some years for a commodity to start being assessed. This request would need to go through the import access request system by way of Import Market Access Advisory Group (IMAAG).

 

Parrots are listed as Priority A for assessment by Biosecurity Australia but are not on the 2010 work plan. Conditions will not be finalised for at least 12 months, and possibly much longer.

 

Biosecurity Australia

 

Biosecurity Australia (“BA”)is the unit within the Biosecurity Services Group, in the Australian Government’s Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, responsible for recommendations for the development of Australia’s biosecurity policy.

 

BA undertakes science-based risk assessments and provides quarantine policy advice to protect Australia’s animal and plant health status and natural environment. It also provides technical advice to enhance Australia’s access to international markets and participates in international organisations that set biosecurity standards.

 

BA develops and reviews quarantine policies. The process to develop a new quarantine policy, where no policy exists, is called an import risk analysis (IRA) and is undertaken by BA scientists and technical specialists.

 

BA also provide scientific and technical advice and support to help Australia maintain or gain entry to international animal- and plant-related markets.

 

BA specialists are active in the development of international quarantine standards and help to develop quarantine expertise in the Australasian region.

 

As a World Trade Organization (WTO) member, Australia is obliged under the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement) to consider all import requests from other countries concerning agricultural products.

 

Decisions to permit or reject an import application can be made only on sound scientific grounds.

 

BA also works with international agencies that set standards for animal and plant health. These are:

 

The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), which informs member countries of animal disease outbreaks throughout the world, and studies new ways of controlling animal diseases and sets international standards.

The International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) which provides a framework for international cooperation, sets international standards and exchanges information on plant health

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Its kindsa remarkably strange, some of the life forms allowed for import into Australia, check the following list from the "Environment Protection Authority" -

 

http://www.environme...port-list_1.pdf

 

They can allow the import of -

 

"Scale Parasitoid Encyrtid Wasp"

 

 

but will not let budgies be imported, personally, those "parasitoid wasps" sound much less welcome than a feathered friendly budgie.

 

 

Admittidly It seems the wasp has the following criterea attached, -

 

 

"Eligible non-commercial purpose only, excluding household pets. High security facilities only."

 

but wouldn't like them to escape.

Edited by trefto

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It looks like every other Aussie native parrot is on the list. House mice and black rats are on the list. I wonder what the 'real' reason is behind not being able to import.

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It looks like every other Aussie native parrot is on the list.

 

Budgerigars are on page 14, but like every other Australian parrot you can't import them because there are no importation protocols in place.

 

I wonder what the 'real' reason is behind not being able to import.

 

Isn't keeping our native parrots safe from exotic diseases a good enough reason?

 

The daff paper below gives an explanation as to why the imports were stopped:

 

http://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CDMQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.daff.gov.au%2F__data%2Fassets%2Fpdf_file%2F0013%2F12046%2F99-090a.pdf&ei=h4yxUrSJEsKekQW_k4CADg&usg=AFQjCNHTS14mGlphym22rklsXBetvZ5oug&sig2=1C9c19g_E1I3PK5GAlAAKA&bvm=bv.58187178,d.dGI

 

A routine review of the live bird importation program was initiated in 1992, and completed in 1993. The

review raised some concerns that the importation of live birds presented an unacceptable risk of

introduction of particular exotic diseases of parrots and related species (psittacine birds) and BRS was

commissioned to undertake a review of relevant literature in 1994.

In light of incomplete knowledge on certain diseases of psittacine birds, and with a lack of definitive

methods for testing imported birds for the presence of these diseases, AQIS suspended importation of live

psittacine birds in 1995. The decision was generally supported by veterinary respondents and the Bureau

of Resource Sciences.

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Yeah Drogo, I definately agree, we need to protect our borders, and the wildlife within, and if it takes no imports for that, then I see it as the best choice.

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I agree with Drogo and Trefto. I would not like to see importation of Parrots in general until there are clear guidelines and procedures in place to protect our Domesticated and wild birds. 1 slip could potentially wipe out a studs and wild flocks. Extreme but that's the reality of why we have quarantine.

 

From the Daff paper is this list.

 

If any of these diseases were introduced how could we possibly counter an outbreak, when for some of them there is no reliable way to test for carriers or infected birds and eggs. As with husbandry prevention is far better than a cure if there is one.

 

 

Highly pathogenic avian influenza

· Newcastle disease

· Avian mycobacteriosis

· Fowl typhoid (Salmonella Gallinarum)

· Pullorum disease (Salmonella Pullorum)

· Psittacosis (Chlamydia psittaci)

· Pacheco’s disease

· Amazon tracheitis

· Poxvirus infection in parrots

· Internal papillomatous disease

· Psittacine proventricular dilatation syndrome.

· West Nile virus

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