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Bird Diseases Contracted Into Humans

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hey as a couple of you may know i have been in hospital for four and a half weeks and now i am wheelchair bound. anyway this has brought to my attention and the doctors attention to look into avairian diseases contracted by humans if you know any please write there name of the disease the symptoms and cure. expecially ones including the swelling of hands and feet numbness and loss of movement. thankyou so much for helping me out :emoticon112: its great to be back on the site xx Elise xx

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Hey LBB ...........I dont know of any bird diseases that would have created your current medical condition. Surely doctors arent just deciding it is bird related ? What are your doctors doing to investigate further on your behalf ?

 

 

Biggest hugs and love Kaz

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I am so sorry to hear this. :emoticon112:

 

Yes, there are diseases that are transmittable from Budgies to humans, the one that springs to mind is Chlamidia Psittacosis and I know Kaz caught it a couple of years ago, I am sure she will share her experience with you.

 

Most of the information I have is that some people develop an acute sensitivity to Feather Dust and suffer respiratory diminished capacity as a result.

 

I am not aware of any disease that would induce paralysis.

 

Hopefully more knowledgeable people than I will post their experiences in reply to your query.

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well kaz and renee do you mind if i pm you details as this is a public forum and i dont feel comfortable sharing everything here

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elise,

best hugs for you :D and may you feel better too i am wishing you will feel healthier and happier soon.

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This is some information I found on the net, it is interesting reading and probably worth everyone having a look at. Especially probably the last disease. It is important that we as bird keepers are always aware of possible diseases that may be associated with our feathered friends.

I have edited the document that was originally very long and have tried to explain some of the more technical terms in brackets, if you need any more explanation just drop a note here and I will try my best :lol: My thoughts are with you LBB in your recovery.

 

 

Source: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/PS019

 

 

 

Avian Diseases Transmissible to Humans

Zoonoses refer to infectious animal diseases that are communicable to humans. Individual susceptibility and the seriousness of these various microbial infections varies with age, health status, immune status (immunodeficient or immunosuppressed), and whether early therapeutic intervention is sought.

 

Chlamydiosis, salmonellosis, arizonosis, and colibacillosis are the most common of these infections. Chlamydiosis, salmonellosis, eastern equine encephalitis and avian tuberculosis may be serious and even life- threatening.

 

 

Chlamydiosis

Chlamydia psittaci , an unusual bacteria-like organism, occurs worldwide and affects more than 100 avian species. It causes a disease called psittacosis when it occurs in psittacine birds (Budgies etc).

 

 

Chlamydiosis is primarily transmitted by inhalation of contaminated fecal dust and is spread by carrier birds, which act as the main reservoirs for the disease. The organism is excreted in both the feces and nasal secretions. Chlamydiosis can be transmitted bird to bird, feces to bird, and bird to human. Human to human transmission can occur, mainly by exposure to patient's saliva.

 

In affected birds, diarrhea, coughing, and ocular and nasal discharges are common signs. In humans, chlamydiosis manifests itself as a feverish respiratory disease. There is usually a sudden onset with chills, muscle and joint pains, headache, cough, loss of appetite, and chest pains. Complications may result from an enlarged spleen, inflammation of the heart muscle, and a reduced heart rate.

 

Affected humans are treated with tetracycline for at least 21 days. Because this antibiotic may become irreversibly bound to certain minerals, the calcium content of food needs to be kept low during treatment.

 

 

Salmonellosis

This bacterial disease occurs most frequently in stressed individuals. Many infections are subclinical. Common clinical symptoms in all species include diarrhea, vomiting, and a low-grade fever. Infections can progress to dehydration, weakness, and sometimes, especially in the very young or very old, death.

 

 

Salmonella are transmitted by ingestion of food contaminated by fecal matter (fecal-oral route).

 

In most cases, treatment of salmonellosis simply involves treatment of the symptoms with fluids and electrolytes.

 

 

 

Colibacillosis

Colibacillosis is caused by Escherichia coli infection. E. coli is a bacteria which normally inhabits the intestinal tract of all animals.

 

Transmission is via the fecal-oral route. Colibacillosis is often food- or water-borne.

 

In most cases, symptomatic treatment (fluids, antidiarrheals) is all that is required.

 

 

 

Arizona Infections (Arizonosis)

Arizona infections are caused by the bacteria Salmonella arizona . S. arizona occurs worldwide. It occurs most frequently in reptiles and birds, but all animals are probably susceptible. The young are at greatest risk.

 

In most poultry species S. arizona infection results in reduced egg production and hatchability. In humans, diarrhea is most common. Many infections are subclinical.

 

 

Transmission is by the fecal-oral route. There is some transmission through eggs. Infected birds can become long-term intestinal carriers. Numerous antibiotics reduce case fatality, but do not clear intestines of the carrier state.

 

 

Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) is caused by a RNA virus in the genus Alphavirus , family Togaviridae. Outbreaks can occur in commercially raised pheasants, chickens, bobwhite quail, ducks, turkeys, and emus. Abdominal distress and dysentery are the most obvious signs.

 

EEE is mosquito-borne. The virus circulates in a mosquito-bird cycle in which passerine birds (i.e., song birds such as swallows, starlings, jays, and finches) are the most common reservoir. The mosquitoes become infected and feed on birds, horses, and humans, further spreading the infection.

 

EEE usually affects persons under 15 or over 50 years of age. In adults there is a sudden onset of high fever, headache, vomiting, and lethargy, progressing rapidly to neck stiffness, convulsions, spasticity, delirium, tremors, stupor and coma.

 

 

 

Avian Tuberculosis

Avian tuberculosis is caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium avium which is closely related to the human and bovine tuberculosis bacteria. In birds, M. avium causes a chronic debilitating disease with tubercular nodules. In humans, M. avium infections can cause local wound infections with swelling of regional lymph nodes. The infection is most severe in immunocompromised individuals. M. avium is spread by ingestion of food or water contaminated by feces from shedder birds. Tuberculous poultry flocks should be depopulate (killed).

 

While most Mycobacterium infections are treatable with antibiotics, M. avium infection is the exception. M. avium is highly resistant to antibiotics. Surgical excision and lymph node removal are often necessary to eliminate infection.

 

 

Cryptococcosis

Another fungus that prefers to grow in soils enriched with avian manures is Cryptococcus neoformans. The incubation period is probably weeks. Infections are seen in many mammals, but occur most frequently in humans, horses, dogs, and cats. Infections are rare in birds.

 

Transmission of cryptococcosis is usually by inhalation of this yeast-like fungus, although it can occasionally occur by ingestion. Humans can pick up cryptococcosis from exposure to old pigeon nests or droppings. In humans, cryptococcosis is manifested as meningitis or meningoencephalitis, and it is usually preceded by pulmonary infection with cough, blood-tinged sputum, fever, and malaise. The course of the disease is usually chronic (fast acting with a fast course). There is usually fever, cough, chest pain, and spitting of blood from the respiratory tract, followed by headache, stiff neck and visual disturbances.

 

As with histoplasmosis, this disease is avian-associated, but not a zoonotic disease because the reservoir is soil and not the birds.

 

 

 

 

 

Cryptosporidiosis

Cryptosporidiosis is caused by protozoa of the genus Cryptosporidium . There are three known species, C. baileyi , C. meleagridis and an unnamed species in quail. Cryptosporidiosis normally causes respiratory problems in chickens and turkeys. It can also cause gastroenteritis and diarrhea. In humans, it causes abdominal pain, nausea, and watery diarrhea lasting 3-4 days. In immunocompromised people, it can cause severe, persistent diarrhea with associated malabsorption of nutrients and weight loss.

 

 

Allergic Alveolitis

Allergic alveolitis, also known as pigeon breeder's lung, budgerigar dander pneumoconiosis, and a variety of other complex names, is one of the most significant avian zoonotic diseases. It may occur as an acute, subacute, or chronic problem. Clinical signs are caused by reduced lung capacity due to a hypersensitivity reaction to feathers, dander, or fecal dust. Inflammation of the pulmonary air exchange units (alveoli) is the inciting lesion.

 

The acute form of the disease is usually precipitated by an overwhelming exposure in a previously sensitized individual, such as that which might occur in cleaning out a pigeon loft. Symptoms occur within a short time, and include cough, difficult respiration, fever, and chills. If exposure ceases at this point, the symptoms resolve and no treatment is necessary. Chronic, low-grade exposure is more serious, and symptoms may be mistakenly attributed to a stubborn cold or flu. Affected individuals have a chronic nonproductive cough, exercise intolerance, and weight loss. Permanent lung lesions may develop, including pulmonary fibrosis that reduces gaseous exchange and lung capacity.

 

Chronic allergic alveolitis can develop in as little as 2 years, but usually takes 10-20 years. Patients diagnosed with the chronic form of the disease may have no choice except to eliminate all exposure to birds. Exposure to even minute quantities of feathers, dander, or feces may precipitate a recurrence of severe respiratory distress. The severity of the disease can be reduced by wearing face masks while cleaning cages, cleaning cages daily, bathing pet birds frequently, and installing air purification systems.

 

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Take care with the above info - we don't have some of those in Victoria or even Australia! In addition, some are only present in wild birds, or waterfowl, or chickens etc. From budgies, the only ones that spring to mind are psittacosis and breeder's lung, both of which are primarily respiratory diseases. There is plenty of info on psittacosis here on this site.

 

If you want to have a google, the word you are looking for is "zoonosis" - diseases that cross from animals to humans. Make sure it's specific to where you are.

 

If you want specific information about each state in Australia, look up the government site for your state. In particular for Victoria, it's this page here

 

Hope this helps...

Edited by Chrysocome

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thanks all for the info nothing sounds like it and i dobt it is from bird but i think its good to cross out all possibilities. but i found it interesting learning this and im sure many other people could benifit from this info :D xx Elise xx

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well kaz and renee do you mind if i pm you details as this is a public forum and i dont feel comfortable sharing everything here

 

 

The earliest form of medicine [middle ages] was to sit at a busy cross roads and speak to passers by about your symptoms and perhaps happen by a remedy from one of said passers by... Don't be afraid to utilize the accumulated knowledge available to you on this site if you feel your doctors are in the dark, they often are. That said, I hope your health is restored A.S.A.P. and that your birds are not implicated in any way, lots of love and positive thoughts...

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well kaz and renee do you mind if i pm you details as this is a public forum and i dont feel comfortable sharing everything here

 

 

The earliest form of medicine [middle ages] was to sit at a busy cross roads and speak to passers by about your symptoms and perhaps happen by a remedy from one of said passers by... Don't be afraid to utilize the accumulated knowledge available to you on this site if you feel your doctors are in the dark, they often are. That said, I hope your health is restored A.S.A.P. and that your birds are not implicated in any way, lots of love and positive thoughts...

Well said Richo :thankyou:

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I hope your Doctors find a diagnosis for you soon. You need a Dr House! It must be so frustrating and scary not knowing. My thoughts are with you and your family. It's great your birds are not likely to be the cause and i hope you can find some peace and joy in them while you are waiting. Pets have amazing results on the human immune system and the bodies ability to heal. :D

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