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does rice have to be cooked or not

is just a rinse all right

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i cook my rice for my birds but i dont know

i cook fryed rice for them

boiled rice with mixed peas corn and carrot

scrambbled eggs then i toss it in pan feed warm

they love it specially the feeding cocks

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i cook my rice for my birds but i dont know

i cook fryed rice for them

boiled rice with mixed peas corn and carrot

scrambbled eggs then i toss it in pan feed warm

they love it specially the feeding cocks

thank you gb another recipe for me to use birds can eat so much more than seed since i found this site :) is tinned corn okay

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i use frozen mix veggies from safe way (Woolworth) tin should be fine just rince well(peas corn carrot diced )

 

 

my birds love green grapes

manderines ,thin sliced banana ,pineapple, water melon,weet bix with milk soked up in it the way i hate them yuk :)

english spinach english lavender ,water cress ,and the odd leg lamb bone and roast chicken cakus cooke(meat only )

but if feeding the meat items be sure to remove in an 2 hour time frame

Edited by GenericBlue

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i use frozen mix veggies from safe way (Woolworth) tin should be fine just rince well(peas corn carrot diced )

 

 

my birds love green grapes

manderines ,thin sliced banana ,pineapple, water melon,weet bix with milk soked up in it the way i hate them yuk :)

english spinach english lavender ,water cress ,and the odd leg lamb bone and roast chicken cakus cooke(meat only )

but if feeding the meat items be sure to remove in an 2 hour time frame

do you mean the lavendor you grow in the garden with purple flowers heads i have that if it same one that would be good for me what part of it would you put in can you use chicken frames from supermarket raw i know you said cooked but i have been wondering for a while about getting those but dont know for sure rather someone that feeds their birds meat to tell me for sure not off a web site

thank you for answering my posts gb

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i use frozen mix veggies from safe way (Woolworth) tin should be fine just rince well(peas corn carrot diced )

 

 

my birds love green grapes

manderines ,thin sliced banana ,pineapple, water melon,weet bix with milk soked up in it the way i hate them yuk :)

english spinach english lavender ,water cress ,and the odd leg lamb bone and roast chicken cakus cooke(meat only )

but if feeding the meat items be sure to remove in an 2 hour time frame

do you mean the lavendor you grow in the garden with purple flowers heads i have that if it same one that would be good for me what part of it would you put in can you use chicken frames from supermarket raw i know you said cooked but i have been wondering for a while about getting those but dont know for sure rather someone that feeds their birds meat to tell me for sure not off a web site

thank you for answering my posts gb

 

your welcome i hate seeing posts that no one bothers to even Agnolage they have read when its such a simple thing to respond to

fair enough if they have no clue but you know what i mean

 

as for the ones from shops i only give them chicken from the roasts i cook for my family

ones i have seasoned and thats so i know what they eatting

 

yes English lavender from garden the whole stem and flowers they pull it apart mainly

 

i read it and tryed it here what i read

Greenfeed is a very important item in the diet. Spinach, silver beet or English lavender is very good, chickweed is excellent, and another item we use is Lemna.

Any green feed fed to your birds should be thoroughly washed before you give it to them. Suspend it from the wire using a plastic clothes peg if possible, and they will enjoy it more.

pm me i will send you the whole article

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is tinned corn okay

Tinned vegies contains sugar and salt. if in doubt read the side of the tin.

Edited by KAZ

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Not sure about there but we do have canned food without salt.

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your welcome i hate seeing posts that no one bothers to even Agnolage they have read when its such a simple thing to respond to

fair enough if they have no clue but you know what i mean

 

Considering these posts seem to have been made around midnite last night.......maybe noone much was ONLINE ???? Before bagging members for "not answering "

posts look at the time they were posted and how many members were online at that time.

 

 

To be considered. :(

Edited by KAZ

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does rice have to be cooked or not

is just a rinse all right

 

It does not have to be cooked, but if you are not cooking it should be soaked for 8-12 hours before giving to your birds. Give long grain, brown, or wild rice instead of white rice. My budgies do not like cooked rice, but they love it after it has been soaked.

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does rice have to be cooked or not

is just a rinse all right

 

It does not have to be cooked, but if you are not cooking it should be soaked for 8-12 hours before giving to your birds. Give long grain, brown, or wild rice instead of white rice. My budgies do not like cooked rice, but they love it after it has been soaked.

thank you so much rainbow i dont know where you found information about raw rice i have been looking since i first posted this few days ago i dint realize it would be so hard to find

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Remember as well that rice swells when exposed to liquid. If the first exposure to liquid is saliva as the bird swallow it and then it enters the stomach, you might end with a bird that dies due to a bloated abdomen. This is the reason that hey say not to throw rice at weddings anymore.

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Isn't that a myth dave?? :(

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One of the most asked questions on yahoo bird answers is..........if you feed rice to a bird does it EXPLODE ?? :(

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:( thank you to everyone Edited by ghazzigh

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I do not think it is a myth. Think about it, if you take rice and you add water, the rice swells right? Thy myth is that the bird will explode. It will not explode, however uncooked rice has the potential to expand, and if a bird swallows a large portion of it, it will make the birds abdomen swell in an unnatural manner, and this may lead to its death.

 

Feeding rice to birds will nto result in an explosion, but the expansion of rice may lead to serious harm.

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that does make a lot of sense to me explained like that thank you

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your welcome i hate seeing posts that no one bothers to even Agnolage they have read when its such a simple thing to respond to

fair enough if they have no clue but you know what i mean

 

Considering these posts seem to have been made around midnite last night.......maybe noone much was ONLINE ???? Before bagging members for "not answering "

posts look at the time they were posted and how many members were online at that time.

 

 

To be considered. :(

 

was not bagging anyone out kaz sorry if it looked that way

im not that way inclinded

yes it was late

and i wasnt talking about her post in general just posts that i have often seen lots of veiws but no responce

they could just be pics

but i didnt mean to sound all like i was being all ....how ever it seemed

SORRY ANYONE WHO WAS AFENDED BY THIS COMENT :o

and i did consider who was on and knew their was only few members really sorry to of upset you was not intended to be read like that

 

 

and dave i agree their

Edited by GenericBlue

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your welcome i hate seeing posts that no one bothers to even Agnolage they have read when its such a simple thing to respond to

fair enough if they have no clue but you know what i mean

 

Considering these posts seem to have been made around midnite last night.......maybe noone much was ONLINE ???? Before bagging members for "not answering "

posts look at the time they were posted and how many members were online at that time.

 

 

To be considered. :blink:

 

was not bagging anyone out kaz sorry if it looked that way

im not that way inclinded

yes it was late

and i wasnt talking about her post in general just posts that i have often seen lots of veiws but no responce

they could just be pics

but i didnt mean to sound all like i was being all ....how ever it seemed

SORRY ANYONE WHO WAS AFENDED BY THIS COMENT :(

and i did consider who was on and knew their was only few members really sorry to of upset you was not intended to be read like that

 

 

and dave i agree their

sorry gb i didnt think you were bagging anyone just having an opinion yes that post was last night late but was posted few days ago because i had been trying to find out few days now and untill last night no answer it wasnt easy to solve let me tell you i looked and looked im worried now that

i suppose where i said thank you to gb libby and liv last night could now be interpred as me having a go at others for supposebly not answering me as well

its not i always try to thank people that help me not missing anyone that way its polite for the effort they make on my behalf :(

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Rice and Birds.........the urban myth

 

 

 

 

Against the Grain

 

Claim: Rice thrown to wish newly-wedded couples well can kill their fine feathered friends.

 

Status: False.

 

Origins: We're cautioned not to throw rice at the bride and groom, because the grain will prove harmful to the birds who swoop down to eat it. The rice expands in those little birdy stomachs, causing our avian companions to explode, we're warned. Let's quit worrying about the birds. They'll be fine. Seagulls don't explode when they eat Alka-Seltzer; pigeons don't explode when they eat rice.

 

This response to a 1996 Ann Landers column in which she "informed" readers about the danger rice poses to birds just about says it all:

 

The USA Rice Federation in Houston has a message for advice columnist Ann Landers - straighten up Cartoon of the legendand fly right when you talk about birds. In a recent column, Landers warned readers that throwing rice at weddings is unhealthy for our feathered friends: "Please encourage the guests to throw rose petals instead of rice. Rice is not good for the birds."

 

"This silly myth pops up periodically, and it is absolutely unfounded," responded rice expert Mary Jo Cheesman at the USA Rice Federation. Many migrating ducks and geese depend on winter-flooded rice fields each year to fatten up and build strength for their return trek to northern nesting grounds.

 

Uncooked, milled rice is no more harmful to birds than rice in the field, Cheesman said. The Curator of Ornithology at the University of California at Berkeley agrees.

 

"It's a myth. There is no reason why birds, including small songbirds, can't eat rice," said Ned Johnson, a professor of biology at Berkeley who lectures frequently on the food and feeding of birds.

Many churchs and reception halls have rules prohibiting the throwing of confetti or rice. These rules work to keep the property clean so that the next happy couple doesn't get its send-off amid the leavings of the previous pair. Confetti is notoriously hard to clean up; not even vacuuming a lawn will return the grass to its pristine condition.

 

Rice poses a unique danger. Not to birds, though; to people. Scattered on a hard surface (such as the steps of a church or a dance floor) it puts anyone who walks across that surface at risk of taking a nasty spill. Far better to prohibit rice throwing at a wedding than to end up with an injured guest.

 

Don't do it for the birds, do it for the inlaws.

 

MORE

 

An urban legend that I've heard (most recently by a teacher during a discussion in a high school English class) is that you shouldn't throw rice at weddings, because after the party is over, birds will come and eat it. White rice, being as dehydrated as it is, will immediately begin absorbing water upon entering the moist environment of the bird's body. It will then swell up, and if there is enough of it in there, the bird's body (specifically the crop, where the food first goes to be stored) will burst, killing the poor little critter. Is there any truth to it?

 

 

Dear Reader:

 

No truth to it at all. In fact, wild rice is a dietary staple for many birds, as are other grains that expand in moisture such as wheat and barley.

 

One thing purveyors of this myth fail to take into account is that the rate at which dried grains absorb liquids is pretty darned slow unless it takes place at cooking temperature. Also, there's a biological process you may be familiar with called digestion. Long before any uncooked rice consumed by a bird could expand enough to cause harm, it would have already been ground up in its crop and in the process of being broken down into nutrients and waste by the acids and enzymes in the bird's digestive tract.

 

It's unclear exactly how and when this misconception originated, though it was most famously promulgated by advice columnist Ann Landers when she published a letter warning prospective brides and grooms against the practice of throwing rice at weddings on May 21, 1988:

 

 

 

MORE

 

 

Should you not throw rice at weddings because birds swallow it and explode?

May 2, 1997

 

Dear Cecil:

 

On a recent NBC Today Show segment, some Martha Stewart wannabe said you shouldn't throw rice at weddings because it kills birds. Supposedly birds eat the rice, it swells in their stomachs, and they explode over playgrounds. Having cooked a lot of rice, I know it takes boiling heat and a good 20 minutes to get it to swell (aside from so-called Minute rice). It seems to me if any bird has an intestinal temperature near boiling, eating a few grains of rice is the least of its worries. Also, despite zillions of weddings, I don't recall seeing piles of blown-up pigeons near churches, nor do I remember seeing inordinate numbers of bird carcasses near rice paddies in southeast Asia. Is there any basis in fact to the rice = bird killer story, or is this yet another urban myth?

 

— David Thomas, via the Internet

 

Dear David:

 

Cecil humbly concedes that the final word cannot yet be written on this urgent subject. Instead, as is his custom, he merely recites the facts as ascertained to date:

 

(1) Personally I think the whole thing is BS, but if I just said that I'd be 500 words shy of a column.

 

(2) Having momentarily tired of the Internet, I had little Ed go on the Mara Tapp show on WBEZ radio in Chicago to see if any of the Teeming Millions had seen birds exploding over playgrounds. Number of calls from kibitzers who wanted to hear what their voices sounded like on the radio: zillions. Number of sightings of detonated birds: zero. Tolja.

 

(3) One guy's idea of a major scientific contribution was to tell us he'd been in a cooking class in Minnesota ten years before, and they'd experimentally determined that dried rice doubles in volume when soaked. Like I didn't know this, you goof.

 

(4) Though maybe the guy's point was that you didn't need to have boiling or even hot water to do this. Little Ed isn't sure. You look at his notes, you think, wow, nice shorthand. Unfortunately he was writing in longhand.

 

(5) My brother-in-law told me that dried barley expands to three and a half times its original volume when soaked, so if you're looking for things to throw at weddings instead of rice I guess barley shouldn't be high on the list. Then again, my brother-in-law also told me he read in a World War II memoir about how they would parachute in bags of rice to the troops in Burma or someplace, and occasionally when a bag went astray people on the ground would later find an empty bag and an exploded cow nearby. But when I spent three hours in the library reading the memoir in question I found zip to support this tale, and it wouldn't surprise me if my brother-in-law hallucinated the bit about barley too.

 

(6) Getting back to WBEZ, another guy claimed he had a friend who was a physical anthropologist, and she told him that when she wants to separate the bones in a skull, she fills it with rice and lets it sit in water overnight, whereupon the rice expands and forces the bones apart. The guy said in his opinion this didn't qualify as exploding. Maybe not, but it's not like having some bird swell up until its skull cracks open is a big improvement visualizationwise.

 

(7) Some people think that, from the point of view of bird endangerment, a distinction should be drawn between regular rice and Minute rice. These people are losers.

 

(8) When we queried the experts at Cornell University--you remember what a big help they were in exposing the grim truth about green potato chips--the director of education and information services wrote back as follows: "I do not have a prepared response [and why not?], but the simplest answer is, 'ricebirds' (bobolinks) have been eating rice throughout recorded history! It's really no different than the birds eating any grain, including millet or wheat, which they do all the time." Testify, sister.

 

(9) My assistant Jane--I tell you, nobody's going to say I didn't throw enough resources into this--says that, judging from her review of pertinent Web sites, the cool thing to do instead of throwing rice is to release clouds of butterflies. I'm not quite picturing this, but I guess you go to the bridal supply house and buy a box full of butterflies and hope most of them survive till the wedding. This is an improvement?

 

(10) A Presbyterian minister called WBEZ to say that the reason they didn't want you to throw rice at weddings was that it was like spreading little roller bearings all over the floor, and insurance companies didn't want the bride and groom to fall and break their necks. Though now that I think about it, using birdseed instead of rice is basically replacing roller bearings with ball bearings. Maybe we should rethink butterflies.

 

(11) I've said this before, I'll say it again. Ain't science great?

Edited by KAZ

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Rice and Birds.........the urban myth

 

 

 

 

Against the Grain

 

Claim: Rice thrown to wish newly-wedded couples well can kill their fine feathered friends.

 

Status: False.

 

Origins: We're cautioned not to throw rice at the bride and groom, because the grain will prove harmful to the birds who swoop down to eat it. The rice expands in those little birdy stomachs, causing our avian companions to explode, we're warned. Let's quit worrying about the birds. They'll be fine. Seagulls don't explode when they eat Alka-Seltzer; pigeons don't explode when they eat rice.

 

This response to a 1996 Ann Landers column in which she "informed" readers about the danger rice poses to birds just about says it all:

 

The USA Rice Federation in Houston has a message for advice columnist Ann Landers - straighten up Cartoon of the legendand fly right when you talk about birds. In a recent column, Landers warned readers that throwing rice at weddings is unhealthy for our feathered friends: "Please encourage the guests to throw rose petals instead of rice. Rice is not good for the birds."

 

"This silly myth pops up periodically, and it is absolutely unfounded," responded rice expert Mary Jo Cheesman at the USA Rice Federation. Many migrating ducks and geese depend on winter-flooded rice fields each year to fatten up and build strength for their return trek to northern nesting grounds.

 

Uncooked, milled rice is no more harmful to birds than rice in the field, Cheesman said. The Curator of Ornithology at the University of California at Berkeley agrees.

 

"It's a myth. There is no reason why birds, including small songbirds, can't eat rice," said Ned Johnson, a professor of biology at Berkeley who lectures frequently on the food and feeding of birds.

Many churchs and reception halls have rules prohibiting the throwing of confetti or rice. These rules work to keep the property clean so that the next happy couple doesn't get its send-off amid the leavings of the previous pair. Confetti is notoriously hard to clean up; not even vacuuming a lawn will return the grass to its pristine condition.

 

Rice poses a unique danger. Not to birds, though; to people. Scattered on a hard surface (such as the steps of a church or a dance floor) it puts anyone who walks across that surface at risk of taking a nasty spill. Far better to prohibit rice throwing at a wedding than to end up with an injured guest.

 

Don't do it for the birds, do it for the inlaws.

 

MORE

 

An urban legend that I've heard (most recently by a teacher during a discussion in a high school English class) is that you shouldn't throw rice at weddings, because after the party is over, birds will come and eat it. White rice, being as dehydrated as it is, will immediately begin absorbing water upon entering the moist environment of the bird's body. It will then swell up, and if there is enough of it in there, the bird's body (specifically the crop, where the food first goes to be stored) will burst, killing the poor little critter. Is there any truth to it?

 

 

Dear Reader:

 

No truth to it at all. In fact, wild rice is a dietary staple for many birds, as are other grains that expand in moisture such as wheat and barley.

 

One thing purveyors of this myth fail to take into account is that the rate at which dried grains absorb liquids is pretty darned slow unless it takes place at cooking temperature. Also, there's a biological process you may be familiar with called digestion. Long before any uncooked rice consumed by a bird could expand enough to cause harm, it would have already been ground up in its crop and in the process of being broken down into nutrients and waste by the acids and enzymes in the bird's digestive tract.

 

It's unclear exactly how and when this misconception originated, though it was most famously promulgated by advice columnist Ann Landers when she published a letter warning prospective brides and grooms against the practice of throwing rice at weddings on May 21, 1988:

 

 

 

MORE

 

 

Should you not throw rice at weddings because birds swallow it and explode?

May 2, 1997

 

Dear Cecil:

 

On a recent NBC Today Show segment, some Martha Stewart wannabe said you shouldn't throw rice at weddings because it kills birds. Supposedly birds eat the rice, it swells in their stomachs, and they explode over playgrounds. Having cooked a lot of rice, I know it takes boiling heat and a good 20 minutes to get it to swell (aside from so-called Minute rice). It seems to me if any bird has an intestinal temperature near boiling, eating a few grains of rice is the least of its worries. Also, despite zillions of weddings, I don't recall seeing piles of blown-up pigeons near churches, nor do I remember seeing inordinate numbers of bird carcasses near rice paddies in southeast Asia. Is there any basis in fact to the rice = bird killer story, or is this yet another urban myth?

 

— David Thomas, via the Internet

 

Dear David:

 

Cecil humbly concedes that the final word cannot yet be written on this urgent subject. Instead, as is his custom, he merely recites the facts as ascertained to date:

 

(1) Personally I think the whole thing is BS, but if I just said that I'd be 500 words shy of a column.

 

(2) Having momentarily tired of the Internet, I had little Ed go on the Mara Tapp show on WBEZ radio in Chicago to see if any of the Teeming Millions had seen birds exploding over playgrounds. Number of calls from kibitzers who wanted to hear what their voices sounded like on the radio: zillions. Number of sightings of detonated birds: zero. Tolja.

 

(3) One guy's idea of a major scientific contribution was to tell us he'd been in a cooking class in Minnesota ten years before, and they'd experimentally determined that dried rice doubles in volume when soaked. Like I didn't know this, you goof.

 

(4) Though maybe the guy's point was that you didn't need to have boiling or even hot water to do this. Little Ed isn't sure. You look at his notes, you think, wow, nice shorthand. Unfortunately he was writing in longhand.

 

(5) My brother-in-law told me that dried barley expands to three and a half times its original volume when soaked, so if you're looking for things to throw at weddings instead of rice I guess barley shouldn't be high on the list. Then again, my brother-in-law also told me he read in a World War II memoir about how they would parachute in bags of rice to the troops in Burma or someplace, and occasionally when a bag went astray people on the ground would later find an empty bag and an exploded cow nearby. But when I spent three hours in the library reading the memoir in question I found zip to support this tale, and it wouldn't surprise me if my brother-in-law hallucinated the bit about barley too.

 

(6) Getting back to WBEZ, another guy claimed he had a friend who was a physical anthropologist, and she told him that when she wants to separate the bones in a skull, she fills it with rice and lets it sit in water overnight, whereupon the rice expands and forces the bones apart. The guy said in his opinion this didn't qualify as exploding. Maybe not, but it's not like having some bird swell up until its skull cracks open is a big improvement visualizationwise.

 

(7) Some people think that, from the point of view of bird endangerment, a distinction should be drawn between regular rice and Minute rice. These people are losers.

 

(8) When we queried the experts at Cornell University--you remember what a big help they were in exposing the grim truth about green potato chips--the director of education and information services wrote back as follows: "I do not have a prepared response [and why not?], but the simplest answer is, 'ricebirds' (bobolinks) have been eating rice throughout recorded history! It's really no different than the birds eating any grain, including millet or wheat, which they do all the time." Testify, sister.

 

(9) My assistant Jane--I tell you, nobody's going to say I didn't throw enough resources into this--says that, judging from her review of pertinent Web sites, the cool thing to do instead of throwing rice is to release clouds of butterflies. I'm not quite picturing this, but I guess you go to the bridal supply house and buy a box full of butterflies and hope most of them survive till the wedding. This is an improvement?

 

(10) A Presbyterian minister called WBEZ to say that the reason they didn't want you to throw rice at weddings was that it was like spreading little roller bearings all over the floor, and insurance companies didn't want the bride and groom to fall and break their necks. Though now that I think about it, using birdseed instead of rice is basically replacing roller bearings with ball bearings. Maybe we should rethink butterflies.

 

(11) I've said this before, I'll say it again. Ain't science great?

oh my goodness kaz thank you this will take me a while to read so ill aknoledge it first and get back to it :blink:

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Science is wonderful. When I was at school, they told us that if something is burned, you get an oxide. Can birds safely consume rice oxide?

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Remember as well that rice swells when exposed to liquid. If the first exposure to liquid is saliva as the bird swallow it and then it enters the stomach, you might end with a bird that dies due to a bloated abdomen. This is the reason that hey say not to throw rice at weddings anymore.

 

When my budgies eat the soaked rice, they "hull" the outer coating and eat the inside as if it were a seed. :P They take little bites of it at a time. They do not like it cooked, maybe because there is really nothing to hull that way?

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Remember as well that rice swells when exposed to liquid. If the first exposure to liquid is saliva as the bird swallow it and then it enters the stomach, you might end with a bird that dies due to a bloated abdomen. This is the reason that hey say not to throw rice at weddings anymore.

 

When my budgies eat the soaked rice, they "hull" the outer coating and eat the inside as if it were a seed. :D They take little bites of it at a time. They do not like it cooked, maybe because there is really nothing to hull that way?

thank you i have done three lots of diffrent rice and gave it to my birds so far so good i havent gave to all my birds i suppose you could say im using some as guinea pigs i mean ive gave it to my birds that have never had any troubles with diffrent things and retired and birds im not breeding so if something did go wrong there is no babies or anything involved i did raw rice brown and then cooked with vegs and things mixed in the birds swamped it :D thank you again

Edited by KAZ

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