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hilly

Hooded Parrots

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Hi thought i'd put some photos up of my hooded parrot pair and their foster baby hoodeds.

The parents of the babies are a recessive pied hooded parrot male with a split pied female.

Forgot to get photos, sorry

They were fostered under the other pair because the hen kills her babies when they hatch, i had swapped the eggs around to give her another try but she did it again. The pair in the photos has one baby left that hatched under a different parrot called a kakariki and is nearly ready to fledge.

 

The male

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DSCF0374.jpg

 

the pair, not a great photo but you can see the hen is a lot duller in colour.

DSCF0379.jpg

 

the babies

DSCF0365.jpg

pied baby one

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pied baby two

DSCF0371.jpg

 

Hooded parrots breed two times a year usually in Feb-March then again in Sept-Oct

This mimics their breeding season in the wild as they are from the top end of Australia and breed according to the seasons up there.

I have to be careful not to check them to much as the mums don't sit on them for long as in the wild they nest in termite mounds which keep the nest at a constant temperature allowing the parents to forage regularly.

After many years of captive breeding you don't need to supply them with a heated box anymore, but an insulated box is a good idea.

These birds act and sound very much like red rumped parrots and are quite pleasing on the ear.

 

Cheers Jenny

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wow they look really nice well done. Interesting about termite mounds, do the termites eat the eggs?

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The male is gorgeous! and the baby's are adorable!

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Thanks pearce, The birds tunnel into the mound then the termites seal it off as maintainence.

Thanks Sunshine not much can beat the colour of the male.

Edited by hilly

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Gorgeous! My partner and i looked into getting one a short while ago to hand rear... Not many people have them around here :(

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Termites don't eat the eggs Pearce. Out in the wild there is an insect (can't remember which) that co-habitates in the termite mound with the bubs and keeps the nest clean (eats poop etc). Again can't remember details. Really fascinating relationship though.

 

Jenny, can you post pictures of the outside of the box? I'm interested to see how people mimic the nest in captivity.

When I had my pair I bought a piece of plumbing pipe and attached it to the front of a medium parrot box and sprinkled freshly dug dirt inside the pipe. The hen seemed to like it as it was a solid fit for her going into and out of the box. The male didn't like it though and stayed well away.

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Termites don't eat the eggs Pearce. Out in the wild there is an insect (can't remember which) that co-habitates in the termite mound with the bubs and keeps the nest clean (eats poop etc). Again can't remember details. Really fascinating relationship though.

 

Jenny, can you post pictures of the outside of the box? I'm interested to see how people mimic the nest in captivity.

When I had my pair I bought a piece of plumbing pipe and attached it to the front of a medium parrot box and sprinkled freshly dug dirt inside the pipe. The hen seemed to like it as it was a solid fit for her going into and out of the box. The male didn't like it though and stayed well away.

 

The hooded parrot Psephotus dissimilis is a little known grass parrot inhabiting open woodlands, grassland and savannah of the Northern Territory (Higgins 1999). Like the closely related golden-shouldered parrot P. chrysopterygius and the extinct paradise parrot P. pulcherrimus, the hooded parrot excavates nests in termite mounds (Hindwood 1959) and is thought to have a relationship with a moth, the larvae of which feed on the nestling's waste and are thought to keep the nest-cavity clean (White 1922; Turner 1923).

 

Information courtesy of the Hooded Parrot Project.

http://www.anu.edu.au/BoZo/stuart/hooded_parrot_project.htm

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Good job Hill! I had no experience breeding a parrot. Anyone can give advise?

 

Thanks,

Carmel

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Good job Hill! I had no experience breeding a parrot. Anyone can give advise?

 

Thanks,

Carmel

 

This is an OLD TOPIC craftsmaster and we are a budgie forum primarily here. ;)

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Good job Hill! I had no experience breeding a parrot. Anyone can give advise?

 

Thanks,

Carmel

 

 

http://www.parrotforums.com/

This site has a load of info on parrots in general. Oh, and this is an old topic. ;)

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oh.. I'm so sorry guys. I'm going to check other thread for the info.

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HI MY NAME IS CARLTON AND I LIVE ON THE BEAUTIFUL CARIBBEAN ISLAND OF ST.MAARTEN.

I HAVE A NUMBER OF AUSTRAILIAN PARROTS IN MY COLLECTION. THESE INCLUDES THE SUPERB, PRINCESS OF WALES, SWIFT, BLUE BONNET, RED RUMP, RED FRONTED, PALE HEADED ROSELLA, RINGNECK, PLUMBHEAD AND OF COURSE THE HOODED. I ALSO HAVE PARROTLETS, SUN CONURES AND THE PAINTED CONURE. ALL MY BIRDS WERE IMPORTED FROM HOLLAND.

I HAVE MY HOODED PARROTS ABOUT A YEAR NOW AND THEY ARE ABOUT 2 YRS OLD. TO DATE I HAVENT HAD ANY SUCCESS BREEDING THESE PARROTS. CAN YOU PROVIDE MORE DETAILED INFORMATION ON ITS NEST AND INCLUDE MORE PICTURES. YOU HELP IS REALLY APRICIATED.

Edited by Carlton St.Hill
FORGOT TO MENTION WHERE MY BIRDS WERE FROM.

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