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Cheeta

Scaly Face

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Can someone please tell me what's the first sign of scaly face? I mean what to look for before the crusty bits and the honeycombs appear on their face. Thank you. I've looked around the net and researched it, but nothing seems to tell me the very first sign to look out for. They have lots of info and pics of already infected birds and how bad it looks, but nothing as a warning before it gets really bad.

 

And also how long will it take scaly face to get from first sign of trouble to being bad? Is it like a really quick time period? or is it spread over a longer and slower time period? Thanks heaps.

 

Cheeta

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Guest Lin

As far as I know the first sign is the scaly stuff on their faces. And I believe in a healthy bird it can take quite some time to develop into a severe case

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I had some birds with scaly face. The first signs I noticed was a difference in the smoothness of the beak and cere and a separation or gap between the side of the beak and the cheek feathers. Treated with spot on invermectin (our avian vet makes his own) and all well within a week or two. I treat all new birds with same product before introducing to the main aviary. Also birds act "itchy" too. Check their feet for white scaly patches and their preoccupation with grooming all over and their feet. :ausb: others may know more...but this has been my experience :D

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I found that "Scaly Face" from the pet stores works okay. Four applications once a day and then once after a week and I have had no return problems. Though I have had only two cases. One with Huey and the other with Jazz. But I caught Jazz's early and it fixed both.

 

With any problems, you have to observe your birds daily and be awear of any changes and act quickly.

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The invermectin my avian vet gave me is a once only treatment.....spot on the skin on the shoulderblades. $9 something for 15 mls which goes a long way. Probably the vet is near you....Wattle grove ?? PM me for details if u like :)

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Thanks all...

 

I am asking because I've noticed some 'roughness' on one of my new babies which is about to come out of quarantine... but then I saw it on her face...

 

Here are some pics and close ups of her beak.... What do you guys think? I think it's scaly, but hoping I'm wrong.. :(:) but I seriously doubt that I'm wrong though. Anyway... Should I treat this little girl or take her to the vet? or is this normal?? I haven't seen budgies with beak quite so rough before... Help please.

 

Thanks.

 

The right side of the beak...

face.jpg

 

Close up of it...

faceClose.jpg

 

The left side of the beak/face

Face1.jpg

 

Close up of it...

Face1Close.jpg

 

 

Oh, just on that, I think I first noticed it a week ago, and it hadn't gotten too much worse. Didn't cross my mind that it could be scaly mite until only very recently...like last night...

 

And also her feet is perfectly normal, not dry or crusty or anything like that. No other crusty bits around the face that I can see either. Which is why i'm asking now.. to nip it at it's bud before it gets any worse.

 

If anyone could shed some lights on that beak, that'll be great! Thank you so very much in advance.

 

P.S... Kaz, I do know the vet you're talking about. He's the best avian vet in Perth. :D I'll be going to him if I need to take this little one to a vet.. :D

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Looks like the tunnels the mites create with scaly face to me...excellent photography, by the way. The treatment he makes and sells works first time. Can make them a tad sleepy when you do it but no ill effects to any of mine and I dosed the lot. :)

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was she in quarentine alone? I remember you bought quite a few yes was it you? Anyways, if so I remember Bea had to treat all her birds in one fell swoop.

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I treated all of mine regardless, once I found a couple of birds with it. They came from the same place and at a time I didnt know about quarantine. I treat any new birds the minute I get them symptoms or not. Also get rids of any other mites or bugs. And like I said, apart from sleepy birds for half an hour no real ill effects.

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oh dear... guess I'll have to make an appointment with the vet...

 

Yes it was me. I just looked at the rest of the birds.. seven in quarantine together... and i'll be treating all those. Should I treat the other ones that they haven't come in contact with yet?

 

Oh when I treat these guys... do I need to disinfect the cage as well?? Just wondering.. I think I'll do it anyway... but just thought I'd ask if it needs to be done.

 

Oh and also.. I was wondering how do they pick up scaly mites? Would you need an infected birds to do that? Or do I need to keep an eye out for them constantly??

Edited by Cheeta

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Scaly Leg and Face Mite (Knemidokoptes)

Holly Nash, DVM, Microsoft Corporation ®

Veterinary Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith, Inc.

 

 

Mites of the genus Knemidokoptes, commonly known as the "scaly leg and face mites," are parasites of the skin and beak of birds. Scaly leg (also called 'tassel foot') and scaly face are common conditions in smaller pet birds. Note: May also be spelled Knemidocoptes or Cnemidocoptes.

 

What are the signs of a knemidokoptic infestation?

 

In budgerigars, canaries, and other small birds, the infestation with mites (mange) causes scaly gray or white crusty lesions on the nonfeathered skin, especially on the legs, feet, and around the beak. In budgies, the lesions usually start at the commissures (corners) of the beak and have a honeycombed appearance. Foot lesions are common in canaries, in which white, tassel-like projections stick out from the legs and feet. Lesions may also occur on the cere (fleshy tissue above the beak) and around the eyes and vent. In severe cases, the beak, feet, and toes may become malformed. In other species of birds, the mites may cause itching and feather loss, but no scaly lesions.

 

How are knemidokoptic mites transmitted?

 

The mites apparently spend their entire life cycle on the bird. They burrow into the epithelium (top layer of the skin) and form tunnels. The mites are transmitted from bird to bird through prolonged close or direct contact. Some experts feel that the mites are transmitted to the unfeathered offspring in the nest, and will cause disease if the bird is genetically susceptible, stressed, or has a suppressed immune system.

 

How is knemidokoptic mange diagnosed?

 

A diagnosis is made by identifying the mites or the eggs in a skin scraping taken from the affected area.

 

How is a knemidokoptic mite infestation treated?

 

Treatment of choice for birds with lesions, and all birds that have had contact with them, is ivermectin. It may require 2-3 treatments at 10 intervals to completely eliminate the mites. The ivermectin may be applied on the skin behind the neck, orally, or injected. It is very important to use the proper concentration, so always check with your veterinarian before treating a bird. Some other treatments are less effective and can be very toxic if they are ingested or get into the eyes. In the past, mineral oil has been applied to the lesions, but it is messy and can result in unwanted side effects, including oily feathers and aspiration of the mineral oil.

 

The cage, bowls, toys, and other items should be cleaned and disinfected. Items that cannot easily be disinfected should be removed and replaced.

 

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cl...&articleid=3068

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