Guest eterri

Homemade Healthy Budgie Grain/seed Mix

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This is taken from a post in a parrot community. The actual recipe is from Gloria at Whitewing Farms.

 

Homemade Healthy Budgie Grain/Seed Mix

I know on parrot_lovers people have talked about making their own seed/grain mix by getting stuff at Whole Foods or similar stores. Here's a recipe for such a mix...

 

Make your own Budgie grain/seed mix:

1 part Quinoa

1 part hulled yellow Millet

1 part safflower seed

1 part Canary Seed

1 part thistle seed

1 part red proso

1 part white proso

2 parts oat groats

1 part amaranth

1 part flax seed

 

Mix them all together and there you go. Happy and very HEALTHY budgies. Now this, incombination with a "Bouquet Salade" wired or clipped daily inside their house.....you have provided an EXCELLENT budgie diet.

-Gloria at Whitewings Farm

 

I'll add that budgies should get equal portions of a good seed mix and a good pellet as well as healthy veggies (high in vitamin A). Legumes are great to offer and there are many cooked mixes on the market now. Wheatgrass is another very nutritious food that you can offer a few times a week. Basically, they need a large variety of healthy foods in order to get everything they need. Feeding budgies properly is no simple matter (unfortunately).

 

ADDED TO FAQ

Edited by Elly

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Sounds excellent. Haven't heard of some of those seeds, but I'll do a google search and see if we call them something different

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I looked into this mix a bit more just to see what makes each seed "valuable." Unfortunately, the woman who originally posted it has recently passed away. :blush: She also believed that this along with greens was enough for a complete diet and was against pellets. I'm going to ask around the group (feeding feathers) to see if anyone knows why she was against pellets but I felt I should mention that because it bothered me that in my first post I pretty much undermined what she believed as far as pellets go. From what *I* have read and what *I* have researched, I would not take pellets out of the diet. Even if this seed mix provides everything pellets do (and I hope to find this out) you can't be sure that your birds are really eating every little type of seed. If they only pick a few favorites, they aren't getting the full benefit from the mix no matter how "complete" it is.

 

I just wanted to point that out because I felt really bad for adding something that Gloria didn't particularly believe in. I'll see what else I can find out, including if any non-Americans have found the equivalent of those seeds and know the names. Which ones have you never heard of?

Edited by eterri

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let me know if you need help, I looked the ingredents up and found websites.

 

Proso is a millet

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Thanks lovey. :blush: I've heard of all the things listed in the recipe but if you can find different names for some of them that would be great.

 

This is probably going to be looong but I found a breakdown of what certain grains provide to birds. This is also by Gloria of Whitewings Farms and I'm copying it straight from her article in Feeding Feathers.

 

Grains and Some of Their Nutritional Attributes

 

Organic Amaranth

 

Amaranth is truly a ‘wild’ grain. Unhybridized, totally unique. It is filling,

warming and energizing. It smells like corn with a woodsy taste. It will store

safely up to a year in a cool dry place. The protein content is unusually high,

riding at 18 percent. It also carries high levels of one of the most vital of

amino acids, IE: Lysine. There is Iron, calcium in greater amounts than in most

grains, as well as higher levels of oil and twice the fiber of wheat. The germ

of the miniscule seed head of this grain and the seed coat contain high levels

of vitamins, particularly E, along with minerals, protein, oil and fiber, with

the germ holding almost all the oil of the protein.

 

Organic Buckwheat/Kasha

 

Buckwheat, or the toasted version called Kasha, is high in calcium and B-complex

vitamins. Kasha is wonderful to serve to the feathers as a dry cereal sprinkled

alone or as an ‘added to’ with seed/grain mixes. Regular Buckwheat can be ground

into flour or purchased as such to add to bird breads or muffins. Buckwheat is

NOT related to wheat in any way, but is actually a member of the Broccoli family

of veggies.

 

Organic Quinoa

 

Pronounced “KEEN-wah” this is a fairly newly discovered ‘grain’ that many

nutritionists are recommending because of its great nutritional profile, and

it’s somewhat nutty distinctive/unusual flavor. Quinoa contains high quality,

easy to digest protein, calcium, iron and the B vitamins.

 

Organic Kamut Grain

 

This is a strain of wheat that has not been cross-bred or hybridized as has

traditional wheat. It is a large golden kernel, and comes to us from Egypt. This

natural wheat has been used quite successfully for some who have wheat

allergies. Kamut runs to about 18% protein and is loaded with calcium,

magnesium, phosphorus, and potassium along with niacin and vitamin E. It carries

ALL the vitamins and minerals within it, but those are the biggies. It is also

high in Lipids and amino acids.

 

Organic Hulled Millet

 

Very easy to digest, this is a healing grain, highly alkaline and can help an

acidic system level out or become alkaline. It is rich in amino acids,

phosphorus, the B vitamins and protein.

 

Organic Spelt

 

Spelt's uniqueness is derived from its genetic makeup and nutrition profile.

Spelt has high water solubility, making the nutrients contained more available

to the body. Spelt contains special carbohydrates, (Mucopolysaccharides), which

are an important factor in blood clotting and stimulating the body's immune

system. It is also a superb fiber resource and has large amounts of B complex

vitamins. Total protein content is from 10 to 25% greater than the common

varieties of commercial wheat.

 

Organic Rye Berries

 

Rye Berries are higher in protein, phosphorus, iron, and potassium than wheat.

They are also high in lysine, low in gluten, high in fiber. Presoak and sprout,

presoak and cook, or add soaked, cooked, or dry to bird bread batters. Combines

well with other grains for an extra little fillip. Tastes very well when

combined with tomatoes……

 

 

Buckwheat

 

Nutritionally, buckwheat is close to wheat in its components, though it is not a

wheat at all. Rather it is a cereal grain and contains no gluten. For people

who struggle with wheat allergies and gluten intolerance, buckwheat is ideal.

This grain has plenty of protein and B vitamins and is rich in phosphorus,

potassium, iron, and calcium.

 

Oat Groats

 

Oat groats are whole oat kernels, cleaned and toasted. They contain nearly all

the original nutrition of the grain, providing more protein than most other

grains. Oat groats are much softer than wheat berries and can be eaten as a hot

cereal or used as a base for salads or sprouting. Ground into flour, uncooked

groats lend a pleasant, sweet taste to breads. They contain no gluten, however,

and must be blended with other flours to make yeast breads. In addition, oats

are very easy to sprout, and their sprouts are even higher in protein and B

vitamins than the whole grain itself. Oats contain a natural preservative that

helps them to keep longer than most grains. Store in a cool, dry place in an

airtight container.

 

Couscous

 

Couscous is a form of wheat pasta used in North Africa where it is served with

meat, vegetables, or fruit. Use it as a breakfast cereal or a cooking substitute

for rice. Whole-wheat cous-cous is far richer in B vitamins, riboflavin, niacin,

minerals, and fiber than white couscous.

 

Organic Short Grain Brown Rice

 

Rice is rich in fiber, low in sodium, and free of fat and cholesterol. It’s

composed of almost 80% complex carbohydrates with only a little protein,

Phosphorus, and potassium. Brown Rice of all varieties contains more vitamins

because the bran layer, which contains most of the vitamins, minerals, amino

acids and fiber, is stripped from the rice kernel in polishing.

 

 

 

If anyone is interested in a similar seed mix recipe for cockatiels, one was posted yesterday that I'd be happy to share. You can use the one from the first post for cockatiels as well but the tiel-specific one sounds good.

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well i hadnt heard of amaranth or proso, then i realised that proso is actually millet :blush: i think ive found a site that sells some of the grains in the list.

 

does it take a while for budgies to convert to this seed recipe?

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The biggest problem is getting them to eat every part of the mix. I'm thinking that in a way, it might be better to purchase each seed/grain separately and introduce them individually. That won't keep them from picking favorites in the end but it might help to let you know that they *will* eat each part of the mix. If they won't eat it when it's all mixed together you could try offering the least favorite seeds/grains in a birdie bread or something.

 

Of course, if you're feeding pellets with it, it's not that big of a deal. You'll know that they're getting a good quality seed mix and that even if they're picky with it, they're getting a lot of nutrition from the pellets too.

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yes that sounds like the best way to to it.

 

i think i will give it a go! it certainly does sound healthier than what you find in trill, you can buy the grains in large quantities and its fairly cheap too, the mix should last for quite a while i would have thought.

 

is there a link where other people have tried this and said how well it goes down eterri? :rolleyes:

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I know really large breeders of finches provide all seeds in seperate containers. I don't know how they ensure that they eat a good range, but they don't use a mix

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You know what I find most interesting (annoying) about having pet birds? It's the fact that the moment you think you know what you're talking about, someone says something that makes you think otherwise. I've found nothing at all bad with this seed mix though, I think it's an awesome thing to try and feed your birds.

 

The opposition came up when I asked some questions about pellets. There were some good arguments against them but only if the arguments are true. When I find out more, I'll post and I think we'll all find it incredibly interesting. The basic point is that some feel pellets are too high in protein to be offered to the smaller birds on a daily basis. I haven't seen any real research but I'll be looking into it. All I can say right now is that my head hurts. It seemed like they meant a pellet-based diet, as in offering more pellets than seed. And that HAS been linked to renal failure so I'm not sure if this is what they meant or not. If so, I wish they'd just come out and say it, you know? :P Don't go on an anti-something spree without providing enough information for people to see exactly WHY it's so bad. Because I've spent a lot of time converting birds to pellets (not to mention a lot of money). :D

 

Anyhow, concerning this seed mix, lovey has PM'ed me with several links that further explain each grain/seed and I'll be posting those later today. They really give you an in-depth look at the benefits of each aspect of this seed mix. lovey said she likes research and she's also very good at it. :D

 

Alsooo the 'tiel mix I mentioned before? Apparently it's also VERY good for budgies. I have a feeling it will be similar to this one though so I'll have a look and then post what I find.

 

When are they going to just make budgie kibble??? :rolleyes:

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I know Terri is going to post websites, I did e-mail the people at http://www.quinoa.com to find out where you can get this overseas. You can check out their site for more information.

 

Here is there response.

 

I'm sure you can find quinoa everywhere. We do not sell to Europe, but there are other companies that do. We do have a distributor in Australia, Kadac PTY located in Cheltenham, Victoria.

 

Best regards,

Linda/Customer Service

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This is some of the information that lovey PM'ed to me. It's very helpful if you're curious about each part of the mix. :P (Thank you lovey! :D)

 

1 part Quinoa - http://www.wholehealthmd.com/refshelf/food...1523,74,00.html

1 part hulled yellow Millet http://www.all-creatures.org/recipes/i-millet-yellow.html

1 part safflower seed http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/afcm/safflower.html

1 part Canary Seed

1 part thistle seed *different types of thistle seed" http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/natres/03102.html or http://www.birdsforever.com/niger.html

1 part red proso http://www.shawcreekbirdsupply.com/seed_red_millet.htm or http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extpubs/plantsci/crops/a805w.htm

1 part white proso same as above website

2 parts oat groats http://www.purcellmountainfarms.com/Organi...at%20Groats.htm

1 part Amaranth http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amaranth

1 part flax seed http://healthlibrary.epnet.com/GetContent....&chunkiid=21714

 

Also, it's looking like the anti-pellet argument has to do with a diet that is nearly all pellets which we already know is bad. I'll have more information a.s.a.p.

Edited by eterri

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im having a really hard time trying to find a supplier online that sells *all* of the grains in the list. i have found one that sells quinoa, yellow millet, amaranth and oats groats but cant find any of the other ingredients.

 

its a shame because it sounds great.

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That's a shame. I'll see if anyone on the list has any suggestions. Maybe there are people who have had the same issue.

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Hey there, i'm currently trying to fund UK suppliers for the recipie above. Any help would be very much appreciated :D

 

Pixie, would you b able to give me that URL please? I don't mind buying from various suppliers...

 

Phil

Edited by phil_doc

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On 31/12/2005 at 7:54 AM, Guest eterri said:

This is taken from a post in a parrot community. The actual recipe is from Gloria at Whitewing Farms.

 

Homemade Healthy Budgie Grain/Seed Mix

I know on parrot_lovers people have talked about making their own seed/grain mix by getting stuff at Whole Foods or similar stores. Here's a recipe for such a mix...

 

Make your own Budgie grain/seed mix:

1 part Quinoa

1 part hulled yellow Millet

1 part safflower seed

1 part Canary Seed

1 part thistle seed

1 part red proso

1 part white proso

2 parts oat groats

1 part amaranth

1 part flax seed

 

Mix them all together and there you go. Happy and very HEALTHY budgies. Now this, incombination with a "Bouquet Salade" wired or clipped daily inside their house.....you have provided an EXCELLENT budgie diet.

-Gloria at Whitewings Farm

 

I'll add that budgies should get equal portions of a good seed mix and a good pellet as well as healthy veggies (high in vitamin A). Legumes are great to offer and there are many cooked mixes on the market now. Wheatgrass is another very nutritious food that you can offer a few times a week. Basically, they need a large variety of healthy foods in order to get everything they need. Feeding budgies properly is no simple matter (unfortunately).

 

ADDED TO FAQ

Thanks for this recipe :)

It helped a lot ❤️ 

my budgies are very thankful :):);) 

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