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Tarsha

How Many Budgies And What Else Can Go In With Budgies?

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Hi all im new to this site and with birds. My next door neighbor gave us a bird as she no longer wanted her. So we took her own and it was a decent cage for her and got another bird to keep her company and got a other female bird. Was about a moth later we decided we want a outside aviary. So we made one yesterday and when we went to transfer the birds into the new big cage the new month one was dead we don't know why but thinking it may have been the cage was to small and the new bird didn't have clipped wings and got to stressed being in the inside cage. Anyway, we made a 2m high, 1 1/2m wide and we ware wanting to know how many budgies etc we can put in there. We have 7 in there at the moment. Also wanting to know what else we can put in there other than budgies. We are thinking of getting some quails??? So what else can we get and how many birds etc can we have in there and so they all get along. Also any ideas why our other bird died???

Tarsha in Lower Hutt Wellington

Edited by Tarsha

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Welcome to the forum. I'm sorry that your one budgie passed away :( I do not have an answer to what caused the budgie to die. It could have been anything.

We are thinking of getting some quails???

Quails are fine, there are a few other member's on here that keep a few quails with their budgies in their aviary,

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Hi and welcome. I'm also sorry for your loss but agree with birdluv... it could have been anything.

 

You said your aviary is 2m high and 1.5m wide... but how deep??? If it's square, then my advice is below. If it's bigger, disregard it lol...

 

As to your aviary, I'm not sure how many budgie you can fit in it, hopefully someone else can help with that. As to the quails, many members also have quails, but I don't think your aviary is big enough for them as well as budgies. I mean I know quails are on the ground and don't fly, but you need to be able to get into your aviary and not be worried about stepping on them etc... I'd want a bit more room. Again, only my opinion and others with more experience may disagree... Good luck anyway!

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your birds could of made the other bird sick does not seem that you quarenteened them

could be why it died

or .... could not be

im no good with sizes but quail need at least 2 meters by two meters so you can come in and out without frightning them

they fly straight up and hit hard if scarred

:{ may hurt themselves

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Please clarify the size of your aviary :)

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Thanks very much still dont know why the budgie died but im guessing stress of a small cage and unable to fly. We have built a bigger avairy its huge lol im not to sure of diamentions but will post them when i have a free min to measure ..,.

Welcome to the forum. I'm sorry that your one budgie passed away :( I do not have an answer to what caused the budgie to die. It could have been anything.

We are thinking of getting some quails???

Quails are fine, there are a few other member's on here that keep a few quails with their budgies in their aviary,

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Guest K&M Breeding

Most likely cause the newer budgie died- was you had 2 females Hardly Ever do 2 females get along and they will fight and they're known to fight to the death.

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Most likely cause the newer budgie died- was you had 2 females Hardly Ever do 2 females get along and they will fight and they're known to fight to the death.

 

KM, maybe you are thinking of how they can fight if they are in a colony breeding situation. When I keep females together, they get a long just fine, bonding, and preening each other.

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Most likely cause the newer budgie died- was you had 2 females Hardly Ever do 2 females get along and they will fight and they're known to fight to the death.

 

KM, maybe you are thinking of how they can fight if they are in a colony breeding situation. When I keep females together, they get a long just fine, bonding, and preening each other.

Have to agree with you Finnie. Sorry, dont agree with you K & M :(

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Guest K&M Breeding

Don't have to agree

 

Just speaking from Experience

 

I've only had 1 set of females bond in my budgies the rest attack each other

 

and if I wouldn't of been home a few weeks ago I would of walked into a dead female Because 2 of them were on the cage floor trying to kill each other for no reason

 

i used to house males together and females together- It didn't work out the females fought too much, Too much blood shed and a few deaths because of it and the cages were bigger than they needed to be for the small amount of budgies that were in it, and they had more food dishes , toys, perches etc then they needed

 

But its nice when it does work out and its nice to allow bird owners to know its a very good possibility the birds will not get along and can kill each other

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its more possible it died as their was no quarantine

but no one will ever know so......its dead thats it

but i do encourage you to quarantine any new birds before entering your flights

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Hey

 

What does quarantining the birds do?? Like how do i do this and what do i need??? How long do they need to be in quarantine for? Like the whole thing from start to finish and what to feed etc Please help ... Getting really upset with the amount of birds that are passing ...

its more possible it died as their was no quarantine

but no one will ever know so......its dead thats it

but i do encourage you to quarantine any new birds before entering your flights

Edited by Tarsha

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Hey

 

What does quarantining the birds do?? Like how do i do this and what do i need??? How long do they need to be in quarantine for? Like the whole thing from start to finish and what to feed etc Please help ... Getting really upset with the amount of birds that are passing ...

its more possible it died as their was no quarantine

but no one will ever know so......its dead thats it

but i do encourage you to quarantine any new birds before entering your flights

 

 

here is the method most use it is vital

 

Budgerigar Quarantine Program

Here is the quarantine practices most show breeeders use

BUDGERIGAR QUARANTINE PROGRAM

 

The following list outlines the steps that should be taken to safely and effectively quarantine new arrivals to protect your existing flock from potential infection.

 

1. EXTERNAL PARASITES (LICE AND MITES)

Spray or treat birds thoroughly with a recommended treatment before putting into quarantine.

 

you could use avian spray but id use this stuff you dilute in water 15 ml to one lt works for 6 months

 

2. INTERNAL PARASITES (WORMS)

Treat with an effective worm treatment program on the second day of quarantine. Treat for two days. All aviary birds should be treated for worms at least four times per year.

 

ivomectin treats for mites and worms but if useing to treat for worms you need to do it once then 2 weeks later to catch any eggs that may of hatched then every 3 months their after

 

3. CANKER

Treat canker with a suitable product of your choice. Treat for five days. There are a number of recommended canker treatments available over the counter or you may consult your avian vet. Mix solution fresh daily.

 

turbosole is best treatment for canker ... ten day treatment for the bird then whole flock every 6 months

 

4. COCCIDIOSIS

Treat Coccidiosis with a suitable product of your choice. Treat for five days. There are a number of recommended Coccidiosis treatments available over the counter or you may consult your avian vet. Mix solution fresh daily.

if you get a brand called baycox you treat for 2 days although i do for three to be certain all get a drink

i also remove water the day before i give any medication in water returning it around 10 am next day medicated then remove every night around 6 pm till 10 am till treatments up this helps each bird get it in to them :)

 

5. MEGABACTERIA

Treat with a recommended medication for ten days. Mix solution fresh daily

the recommended treatment for this is just to keep it at bay its lemmons and oranges 3 days a week with apple cider vinigar in water 2 days a week for life

6. NUTRITION

Supply extra vitamins, minerals, Probiotics and protein for the entire quarantine period

use probiotics for 3 days in between each treatment of medication after one full day of plain water so medication for lenghth suggested then water clean of anything then probos for three days then plain water from then one unless keeping megga at bay where you will put apple cider vin in each twice a week

7. QUARANTINE PERIOD

Quarantine your birds for a period of not less than 30 days (recommended by avian vets 90 days). Always handle your own birds first, wash your hands with an antibiotic hand wash, or wear disposable gloves prior to handling your quarantined birds. It is also advisable to wear different footwear with the quarantined birds.

 

8. CAGES Minimum size for budgerigars is 600mm x 450mm x 350mm.

 

9. POSITION

 

*

Inside conditions; separate air space. (meaning a different room)

*

Outside conditions; At least five meters from other birds.

 

10. PREPARATION· Clean and disinfect quarantine cages.

 

*

Place paper on the bottom of cage and change regularly.

*

Wash and disinfect all food and water containers.

*

Be careful not to carry droppings, feathers, or any other waste back into your existing aviary.

*

Wash hands after caring for quarantined birds.

 

11. OBSERVATION DURING QUARANTINE. WHAT YOU SHOULD LOOK FOR.

* Prolonged inactivity.

* Eye or nasal discharge.

* Weight loss.

* Soiled vent or diarrhea.

* Cages lined with paper make observation of droppings easier.

* Wheezing or gasping.

 

If any of these signs occur, separate the affected bird(s) from the other quarantined stock and contact your avian vet.

In the event of a disease outbreak, keep a record of dates the disease was first detected and the type of disease and

notify your club secretary. Do not allow other club members to come into contact with diseased birds and always

assume strict hygiene.

Do not sell - auction or trade diseased birds.

 

i know this sounds like a lot of stuff and it is costly but in the end it is a needed thing at the price of a bird the cost of having a medicine cabinet is really not that much you may need to take a bird to your closest avian vet to be able to receive products in future through mail however this cost of 45 for a consultation is well worth it in end

if you become a member with rob marshall http://www.birdhealth.com.au/about/marshall.html

you can get these things by simply sending a poo sample away

 

good luck

 

i did notice the main treatment their missing doxaline or doxyvet you treat the birds for 2 weeks if any signs of depression along with large poo you stop this treatment however if the poo gets smaller and birds way more active continue for 45 days to treat Chlamydia psittaci

 

 

C. psittaci's ability to mystify us does not end with classification. It can cause disease in humans, other mammals and birds. It can kill a bird in 48 hours or it can survive in birds causing no outward sign of illness, for as long as 10 years. It can be explosively contagious or barely contagious.

 

It can be destroyed by antibiotics easily or with incredible difficulty. It can be easy to diagnose or extremely frustrating. It can kill baby birds and cause no disease in their parents. It can live outside the body, as well as within. It can be easy to control or almost impossible. It causes massive flock outbreaks one year and none the next.

 

Individual Susceptibility

The incubation period of psittacosis, as well as the degree of clinical illness, adds to our bewilderment. Just how a bird manifests its exposure to the disease depends on host susceptibility and the virulence (strength) of the strain.

 

 

Host susceptibility. Some birds, because of their genetic resistance, are less likely to become ill and, consequently, are more likely to develop into carriers. These include pigeons (one study suggests 70 to 90 percent of all wild pigeons are carriers), doves, budgerigars, cockatiels, cockatoos, herons, gulls, hawks, and approximately 100 additional sylvatic species. Other species, such as rosellas, lorikeets, neophemas, mynahs, canaries and some parrots have low natural resistance and are highly susceptible.

 

 

Young birds, due to the relatively incompetent immune systems, are subject to neonatal psittacosis with subsequent high mortality. Any factor that stresses a bird will lower its resistance and increase its potential susceptibility and mortality. Egg production, feeding young, weaning, poor management, overcrowding, concurrent infections and molting are just a few of the many things that stress birds.

 

 

The individual power of any agent to infect is known as virulence. This power is subject to change, especially as it inoculates birds and is passed out in the stool. Since each gram of stool from diseased birds can infect 10,000 other birds, the agent's power to cause psittacosis becomes very pertinent.

 

 

Transmission

 

Transmission of C. psittaci is also unsettling. The organism is shed in the nasal secretions and in the stool from infected birds, recovering birds and carriers. Once outside the body, the organism can live for a long period of time, drying to form dust and infecting the susceptible hosts as they breathe. Fecal and oral contamination are especially significant in crowded conditions, as well as in nest boxes. As a general rule, inhaled Chlamydia will cause severe disease, while ingested Chlamydia will tend to develop into carriers.

 

 

Transmission through the egg has been experimentally produced in ducks, but as a practical problem, is not documented in psittacines.

 

Symptoms and Diagnosis

 

 

The clinical symptoms can be variable, depending on the species infected, the virulence of the agent, the route of exposure and concurrent stresses. The "typical psittacotic bird" is ruffled, depressed, has labored breathing, nasal and ocular discharge, and is neither eating nor vocalizing. The appearance of lime-green or yellow droppings, especially when the urine component is discolored, is highly suggestive, although not diagnostic, of the malady.

 

 

One form of psittacosis seen infrequently manifests central nervous system signs. Tremors, shaking, head twisting and convulsions may be the only symptoms you see. This clinical peculiarity has been recognized in Amazons, African greys and cockatoos. Cockatiels can develop a psittacosis syndrome that causes paralysis of the limbs, and usually dark, tarry stools. Additionally, cockatiels and neophemas (turquoisines, scarlet-chested parakeets) with low-grade infections may seem to have an eye disease resembling a sty.

 

Diagnosis of chlamydiosis in birds is definitive only if the organism is identified, isolated or causes a predictable physiologic response. The identification of the organism is achieved by stains or a fluorescent antibody test.

Treatment

 

Treatment for parrot fever is now much more successful than it once was. Most veterinarians use tetracycline and its derivatives, mainly Vibramycin, to treat sick patients as well as carriers. The antibiotic can be given by intravenous or intramuscular injections, orally or mixed in proper ratios with palatable food. Calcium must be withheld - it binds the tetracycline. Blood levels of tetracycline can be enhanced by citric acid in the birds' drinking water.

 

Patients in chlamydial crisis need intense, supportive care (heat, isolation, extremely clean conditions, absence from stress, etc.) as well as therapy for concurrent problems. Appropriate lactobacillus, as well as antifungal medications, are essential.

 

Control and Prevention

Controlling avian psittacosis is best accomplished by keeping susceptible birds away from the infecting agent. Since this little "microvarmit" can remain infective for many months in dried excrement, cleanliness and disinfection are essential. The Chlamydia species is inactivated by quaternary ammonium compounds. These disinfectants should be used to clean cages and wet-mopped on surrounding areas. Eliminating drafts and spraying the area with disinfectants will help keep infectious feathers and dust to a minimum. Birds that have had the disease or are under treatment are fully susceptible to reinfection since the disease does not convey immunity.

 

In wild birds, psittacosis is controlled naturally by the inability of sick birds to keep up with the flock. Additionally, infective droppings fall to the ground below the trees in which the birds perch. The clinical disease that we see in pets is promoted by confining, crowding, transporting, dietary changes, exposure to other infections and forced exposure to infective excrement…

 

This article above came from

http://www.multiscope.com/hotspot/psittacosis.htm

 

Please read whole article and you will understand why I use the Antibiotic called “Doxycycline” as “first choice”

Medication.

You will notice the difference straightaway after treatment!

 

 

hope that helps

never ever just by birds randomly and put straight into a flight try buy all birds from one supplier /breeder at the one time making sure birds are not to closely related if you aim to bred

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Just asking, I recently got an aviary with the dimensions of 1.5m tall, 1.5 m wide and 80cm long. How many budgies could I put in here for the to be happy and safe?

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