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Dave_McMinn    0
first time i have seen that picture throwback, thanks for sharing. makes me remember hommers birds that he posted a long time back (as hommer hasn't been here for ever either) his birds had a few black lines in the chest feathers, nothing like this bird (who looks stunning) and we all here thought it might have been stress marks from what i remember in the thread.

 

I'm going to break out in stress marks if I keep breeding these different budgies!!

 

A new one that has come through with a very black head and wings!

 

When I picked throwback for a name I wasn't kidding!! :wub:

 

DSC00580.jpg?t=1215786089

 

Whilst I liked your other one, this one I am really interested in.

 

This one has the potential to help in the development of the black budgie in my utterly useless and uneducated-in-these-matters opinion.

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*Nerwen*    0

another interesting one there, will look forward to pictures once it fledges

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Elly    0

I agree I would love to see how clear it's cap gets if it does.

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You do see a lot of natural variation in the darkness and also the speed at which it clears. My last clutch was only two babies, both identical (blue spangles). The one that went to a lady I know had a cap which had started to recede by the time it was 5 weeks old but the other one still had stripes to its brow when it went to AV last week and it was always darker than the other.

 

As with all these now we have to play the waiting game and see how it turns out, fingers crossed.

Edited by melbournebudgies

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Elly    0

It is amazing I have seen that and Hommer (who has been MIA) had babies like yours that had the thicker black stripes to the cere, in fact there was a discussion about that too why some don't and some do, I am sure it is due to mutations too.

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bruffy    0

SORRY I think I posted this in the wrong area?

mighty interesting subject!

(i'll eventually get to the point- BLACK)

I wouldn't mind if someone could give me their thoughts on FLECKING I don't have much knowledge in the genetics department as yet so i'd like to leave this to others- over the years i've noticed that these birds on most occaisions are generally extremely good in many ways for exhibition though flecking is frowned upon.

i've mates in WA with birds that are that heavily flecked that the black on the head feathers are showing as spots (just like cheek spots, only in relation to the size of the head feather) nearly making the head completely black- could this be a possible starting point? or would it have no impact?

any thoughts would be appreciated.

In regard to club treatment look how melanistic spangles are being treated! why are people so damn one eyed ! how many years does it take to get a new variety recognised- especially from regarded breeders over the world?

HEADS NEED TO BE PULLED OUT OF THE SAND! lets progress this dying fancy! not kill it!

Edited by bruffy

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**KAZ**    0

Totally agree with you there Bruffy :D Seems the opalines are the way to go to work with the black budgie experiment, Worth looking into the way melanin works in the budgie. :)

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Guest throwback   
Guest throwback
Yeah your right Norm.....

TB ! I am sooo glad you posted that picture again .. ( which by the way is getting more pretty each time i see it :D )

 

 

It's a shame I can't say the same about yours Neat! :) You'll hurt yourself!

DSCF1029.jpg

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bruffy    0
Totally agree with you there Bruffy :D Seems the opalines are the way to go to work with the black budgie experiment, Worth looking into the way melanin works in the budgie. :)

 

thanks Kaz, when I was over WA I contacted you to buy birds, but the fundige situation change on me.

I've got a couple of decent flecked opalines i might play with, I think I would feel better not to conform to the rule & continue not to show but to develop, do you know anyone that may have melanistics? would like to get a hold of a pair (even if they are related, go the splits)

Steve

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**KAZ**    0

Some members on this forum have melanistics :)

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bruffy    0
Some members on this forum have melanistics :)

 

Thanks again will do some research

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*Nerwen*    0

kaz- who other than, Me, Daz and Karen have Melanistics?? If any?..

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**KAZ**    0
kaz- who other than, Me, Daz and Karen have Melanistics?? If any?..

Just you three :)

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Guest throwback   
Guest throwback
SORRY I think I posted this in the wrong area?

mighty interesting subject!

(i'll eventually get to the point- BLACK)

I wouldn't mind if someone could give me their thoughts on FLECKING I don't have much knowledge in the genetics department as yet so i'd like to leave this to others- over the years i've noticed that these birds on most occaisions are generally extremely good in many ways for exhibition though flecking is frowned upon.

i've mates in WA with birds that are that heavily flecked that the black on the head feathers are showing as spots (just like cheek spots, only in relation to the size of the head feather) nearly making the head completely black- could this be a possible starting point? or would it have no impact?

any thoughts would be appreciated.

In regard to club treatment look how melanistic spangles are being treated! why are people so damn one eyed ! how many years does it take to get a new variety recognised- especially from regarded breeders over the world?

HEADS NEED TO BE PULLED OUT OF THE SAND! lets progress this dying fancy! not kill it!

 

Flecking is thought to have come from Opaline's in the attempt to produce birds with big spot, the doubling up of birds carrying a lot of melanin produced birds with multiple layers of spot. Some birds were that heavy marked it looked like they had a black circle around there head! The result of putting these birds to all the other varieties is what we have today.

 

Flecking ( in my opinion ) will not produce a black headed budgie. I think more is needed than that. The ones I have seen on the net suggest to me it is more of a doubling up of the original black normal zebra markings. Than just a collection of flecking! But until you see on in the flesh or should I say feather who knows???

 

You only have to look at the resent National pics to see that flecked birds can still win major places!

And even pieds with no spot can win there section as well.

 

Hang on I've just got to pull my head out of the sand for this next one!! POP!

I was offered a huge Malanstic spangle on the weekend and nocked it back!

I am not a fan of a bird that you cannot control. There is no control as to what you end up with! The single factor looks like a normally marked bird with the exception of both tail feathers being white. With each moult the wings markings change from normal to spangle markings. How do you predict this outcome? The double factor form produces a full body colour with clear wings. Some breeders are already saying that the Malanstic is affecting the DF spangles which a lot now have colour suffusion through there body!

 

I have a pair of heavily flecked normal greys at the moment have 3 babies. So I will post the out come of this pairing, my hope is to produce a super clean headed bird with the head quality of the parents. Not a black headed one!

DSC00178-1.jpg?t=1216551346

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Guest lonebudgie   
Guest lonebudgie

The problem with new varieties is not that people shun them , but you have to understand the fundementals behind the bird , how it breeds , dom recessive etc etc , and then you have to be able to fit it into the show matrix somewhere , this takes years and years , so peoples nature is to shrug and move on .

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Guest throwback   
Guest throwback

As I've said before you need a aviary full of the new variety before anyone will take notice, and as lonebudgie said know the genetic outcome of pairings of the new variety and detail history.

Having one of two freaks is not enough.

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Neat    0
Yeah your right Norm.....

TB ! I am sooo glad you posted that picture again .. ( which by the way is getting more pretty each time i see it :P )

 

 

It's a shame I can't say the same about yours Neat! ;) You'll hurt yourself!

DSCF1029.jpg

 

That is only because I seen the REAL YOU :)

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Guest throwback   
Guest throwback
Yeah your right Norm.....

TB ! I am sooo glad you posted that picture again .. ( which by the way is getting more pretty each time i see it :P )

 

 

It's a shame I can't say the same about yours Neat! ;) You'll hurt yourself!

DSCF1029.jpg

 

That is only because I seen the REAL YOU :)

 

 

Ditto!

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